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But aren't you worried you'll lose access to your music? I have to own it! I can't have it at the whim of multiple third parties to take down as they see fit. It's too important.



Nothing in my Spotify is rare, I can hunt it all down again. If Spotify pulls the plug then the biggest hassle will be recovering the track names of all the music in my sprawling playlists (which I should probably start backing up now). The benefit of Spotify to me is spending $10/mo on the >$10 of new music I listen to each month.


So where do you store these files that you'll never lose access?

CDs? People with a room full of 8 tracks or cassettes would like to have a word.

HDDs? Those fail all the time, plus any sort of natural disaster could wipe out your collection.

Online backup? This seems like the only real option, but for me the risk/reward just doesn't fit.

At least for now, the record companies and the service providers are both incentivized to have as much of their catalogs as possible on streaming services. Until that changes, streaming works for many.


One copy on each of:

-My desktop at home

-My server in the basement

-My work laptop's external hard drive

-An external hard drive in a fireproof lockbox (server backup)

-An external hard drive on a shelf at work (server backup)

-An external hard drive in my parent's house 150 miles away (server backup)

Try prying my files from my cold dead hands.


How do you keep them all in sync when you rip new music?


I put it on my desktop. I back it up to the server. Over the next few weeks/months, I connect an external drive to the server, update, and swap with the other 2. The work laptop drive gets updated from the server over rsync/SSH when I want to listen to my new stuff (almost right away).


At least for now, the record companies and the service providers are both incentivized to have as much of their catalogs as possible on streaming services. Until that changes, streaming works for many.

There is a solution for the rest: let me mix songs from Spotify, my own library, and any other services I pay for in a single playlist.


On my server at home, which has redundant data drives (drivepool) and is backed up locally.

I can access this from every device in my house, and from outside my network.

I can put anything I want onto my phone, USB stick or iPod and play in most any modern car.


Your beef with CDs is they'll become out of date? Did you not read the article, CDs are already pretty much the pinnacle of audio formats.


You don't back up your hard drive?


I had an album (albeit free) on bandcamp dissappear from my library.

Luckily it's on a backed up RAID6 array, in private server, streamable whenever I want.

I mirror all my purchases onto equipment I own, and so I guess I get the benefits of both.


> Online backup? This seems like the only real option, but for me the risk/reward just doesn't fit.

What risk? You can privately store your music anywhere, it's completely legal to do so.


I'm considering which online backup service to use for my music collection, is there a particular one you'd recommend, other than the obvious players like Dropbox, Google Drive and OneDrive?

Preferably not hosted in the US, for privacy/bandwidth reasons.


Backblaze no question about it. Use encryption and you won't have to worry about privacy. It's expensive to recover your data, so you'll need other backup methods too unless you're made of money.


Backblaze is very lacking in Linux support, unfortunately.

For now, I've decided on pCloud, in addition to an on-site copy on my NAS and a copy on a portable drive that I store at work and update semi-regularly. A couple of rsync scripts take care of everything.

I know it's a cloud storage service and not a an actual proper backup service, but they offer 15 days of rewind as standard, and you can get a full year of rewind as an add-on, which I am considering. That should hopefully protect me from accidental deletes, and give me enough time to restore if my house burns down.

The thing that has really sold me on pCloud is that their Linux client is absolutely amazing. Compared to the barely functional Dropbox client and the non-existent Google Drive client[¤], it is an absolute joy to use. At the moment it's an Ubuntu-only AppImage, but they're working on an improved Electron version.

One additional nice thing is that pCloud is a Swiss company, so their privacy laws (and the GDPR) apply. They do host their servers in the US, so you're not completely free from theoretical NSA/PRISM snooping, but in my case I'm primarily storing my music library. They can go ahead and snoop through the tags of 300+GB of music for The Anarchist's Cookbook or whatever.

[¤]InSync is pretty nice, and I did buy a license for it a while ago, but it's still not as good as pCloud's client.


I use my own 10€/month 2TB server with OVH but also have it synced to Google Drive.


I wasn't clear. The risk of a streaming service turning off some music vs. storing and backing up everything in some lossless format like FLAC.


Not OP, but my collection is

- stored on the desktop for fast and performant access

- synced to an NAS daily for central access around the house/network

- uploaded offsite to cloud storage daily as backup


Do you feel the same about cable TV or Netflix?


Yes.




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