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My takeaway, based on observations over the past few years, is that for many knowledge-work professions today, particular software engineering, there's a rather steep discount curve applied to one's experience. In many cases, your experience simply doesn't matter at all -- or, worst case, it counts against you. This obviously depends heavily on what 'segment' of the job market you're in -- nonprofits and the public sector come to mind as probably exceptions -- but I think it holds for a good portion of the software job market today.



for many knowledge-work professions today, particular software engineering, there's a rather steep discount curve applied to one's experience.

Software Development comes down to a whole lot of cost/benefit tradeoffs. A project can accumulate tens of thousands of those. The valuable sort of experience in software actually comes in the form of well generalized cost/benefit decision making heuristics. There are also poorly formulated cost/benefit heuristics which can prevent the creation of value. (The worst of these, being unfounded bias.)

I think a big part of the problem, is that those who don't have such experience aren't in a good position to evaluate how good or bad someone's heuristics are. There is a tendency in situations like that for people to fall back on their own biases.


Firstly, consider that the people in corporations who decide what other people are worth are usually very ill-equipped to judge technology candidates' values.

And secondly, they often just care about getting the thing done. Your potential value in other areas matters much less in the now, and unfortunately "the now" is primarily what modern companies are focused on.




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