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I'm a "n00b" in this sector, so pls. feel free to correct me:

1) RTX is meant to be linked to "raytracing".

2a) Raytracing in general computes a scene by computing how photons are affected by matter - e.g. a full reflection by an absolutely smooth non-absorbing surface or a partial reflection&path_divergence done by liquids, etc... .

2b) In the simulation, the photon that "bounces off" a surface is then "rebounced" by another surface and so on, and this creates a picture similar to the one we use to see in the real world.

3) RTX maybe cuts the whole "rebouncing" and generation of photons a bit short, meaning that there isn't really any new next-gen technology but it's just a bit more processing power that is available to do some additional parallel short/semi-pure raytracing stuff, but which does not work when your scene is complex and it does need many reflections "rebounded" many times.

Again: this is just my initial understanding.




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