Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

On the other hand, maybe so much peer rejection means something... just like when we say that if some problem happens constantly for years to people it must mean the process should be blamed and not the people, if there are so, so, so many complaints it must mean something about them is probably true...

The fact is that Electron is a good platform for ONE application. Once everybody jumps in and makes their application with Electron, and all applications running in your machine are electron, then you as an user have a big problem, basically no battery life.

I wrote an incomplete PopcornTime clone with QML, I've also practiced by cloning the UI of some known apps such as Slack and Spotify, it was very pleasant and immensely saner in terms of resource usage of the machine. But alas, yes, you need to know C++, and that means you need to know about memory managenent and fine details of how things are done under the hood (although maybe that one is not a bad thing at all...)




> On the other hand, maybe so much peer rejection means something...

Only if the conclusion was arrived at independently and wasn't a product of groupthink. Software development is extremely prone to groupthink and exaggerated dogmatic thinking (blind hatred for PHP (and Javascript up until SPAs became a thing), religious wars over linux/mac, your text editor of choice, language of choice, OOP vs FP and so on). Often an idea catches on and suddenly a large percentage of vocal developers are all echoing the same sentiment.

Electron is a memory hog and a weird platform given it ships with so much overhead, sure. But it's fast to develop on, and with modern machines you can run multiple electron apps at the same time. There's just no viable alternative - building a cross platform desktop app without it requires going back in time 20 years and having to learn a bunch of complicated nonsense about memory management and object lifecycles (and I'm saying this as someone who knows said nonsense fairly well) just to draw some buttons on a screen. And all that effort for 1/10th of the UI flexibility that HTML/CSS/JS affords you.

In other words, electron is OK because the alternatives suck. That doesn't mean it's good but it's the best of a terrible bunch.


I agree. Also I wish QML+Python shared some of the hype


honestly, I would be happy with a platform that compiles HTML+CSS+JS down to a binary using something like Qt so you don't need to ship 2 huge engines to support it. I can imagine that's a lot of work though unless you were to exclude a large % of HTML+CSS functionality.

learning a second layout system just for desktop apps is going to be a bit of a hurdle for gaining dev enthusiasm.


> The fact is that Electron is a good platform for ONE application. Once everybody jumps in and makes their application with Electron, and all applications running in your machine are electron, then you as an user have a big problem, basically no battery life.

That's a huge cultural problem right there. Some devs seem to think that their software is a special masterpiece (obviously, since it's made by an ensemble of rockstars), and therefore it'll run alone on users' computers. But that's nearly never the case; even the least technical users run many applications at the same time. Unless you're writing a fullscreen videogame, your software should never assume it has 100% of machine's resources for itself, and these days, even most videogames shouldn't.

(Or, in other words, tragedy of the commons.)




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: