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Last I checked, grocery stores and restruants are still open and planes are still in the sky. The remainder are people who are on the invisible end of society.

This isn't to say that the shutdown isn't a big deal but it should be grounded in the reality of who and what it actually affects.

The typical American could, at this point, realistically not notice anything is happening if it weren't for the news.




grocery stores and restruants are still open

I'm not saying they're closed; I'm talking about food inspections. Remember the romaine scare from November? Guess what won't be flagged early during this government shutdown?

While people should take seriously the recent outbreak of E. coli food poisoning that triggered the alert, the fact that it was flagged early shows that the agency once known as the CDC deserves its upgraded name as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/commentary/ct-pe...

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Also, let's talk about this:

The remainder are people who are on the invisible end of society... it should be grounded in the reality of who and what it actually affects.

44 million Americans use SNAP benefits. 5 million Americans are of indigenous descent. 800,000 Americans employed by the federal government are not getting paychecks. Some ostensibly large percentage of the 3.7 million federal contractors are not getting paychecks. That's about one-sixth of the population of the United States. Maybe typical Americans should pay more attention to their neighbors and friends.


The romaine/E. coli scare in November was first detected by doctors and hospitals who reported infections to the CDC, which is still open.

It might be harder for the FDA to track down the source of a similar outbreak now, since they are partially (but not completely) shut down, but we would know about it.


> Maybe typical Americans should pay more attention to their neighbors and friends.

None of the groups you listed are uniformly distributed across society. "Six social groups each containing 0 people on food stamps, and one social group in which people are mostly on food stamps" is closer to reality than "seven social groups each of which have about 1/7 of the membership on food stamps".

The whole point of living in a nice neighborhood is that none of your neighbors or friends are on food stamps.


>The whole point of living in a nice neighborhood is that none of your neighbors or friends are on food stamps.

Can you explain further? Because it sure sounds like you're somehow equating people being on food stamps as being bad neighbors or friends. I'd like you to explain your logic here.


A neighborhood full of people on food stamps is a bad neighborhood. Those people are the people who the residents of good neighborhoods are trying to stay away from.

They are fairly likely to be good neighbors to each other, in that impoverished people are generally part of a favor-trading network with family and neighbors. But they are undesirable neighbors to other people.


And where, exactly, is your proof? Why would people be on food stamps be considered bad for a neighborhood, and what do you mean by 'Those people'? What makes them 'undesirable'?

I've lived near people on food stamps before, either due to temporary circumstances or permanent ones. I'd like you to properly explain your reasoning here considering it's ringing 'White Flight' alarms in my head.


> I'd like you to properly explain your reasoning here considering it's ringing 'White Flight' alarms in my head.

This... sounds like you agree that the residents of good neighborhoods are trying to stay out of bad ones. What are you trying to dispute?




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