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The concept is excellent, but the ratio doesn't work for me.

I prefer 42/18.

42 because it is the Ultimate Answer of Life, the Universe, and Everything:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrases_from_The_Hitchhiker%27s...

and 18, because it is the Gematria for the word "life":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gematria

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chai_%28symbol%29

If I'm going to adopt a system, my inner nerd insists upon increasing efficiency by using components with multiple purposes.




The Pomodoro Technique(TM) is essentially the same, but waltzing in 25/5 time. A longer interval makes more sense to me too, though. Maybe 45/15 or 50/10; either way, it helps block out distractions - "No, self, I committed to working on this for another fourteen minutes."

I wrote an Emacs work / rest timer (http://github.com/silentbicycle/zwiebel) for that sort of thing, if anybody's interested. (I hooked it up to an XOSD (http://ignavus.net/software.html)-based alert.)

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I used to use 45/15 for studying. I could do amazing feats of rapid learning in college that way.

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I wrote a PyQt timer for doing the same thing. http://code.google.com/p/ptimer/

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There is Chromodoro plugin for Chrome (not very useful unless doing web work)

Pomodoro Timer applet for Gnome (http://linux.softpedia.com/get/Utilities/Pomodoro-Timer-5582...)

RsiBreak for KDE (http://www.rsibreak.org/)

Pomodoro Tasks for Android (currently using)

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No timer for me. I drink plenty of water and hence have to take frequent breaks. Never timed it but it might be around 45 min.

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I know somebody else mentioned it below somewhere, but since this is the top-most entry regarding software, there is another very good multi-platform program called workrave. I used it while at work with the previously mentioned 48/12 division, but 30/30 sounds great, too. I am going to give it a try right now...

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I just found this one for windows, http://sourceforge.net/projects/pomodorotimer/. The most useful feature is that you can set the work and break times - something missing from the few other timers I have tried.

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I spent ages looking at various timer software and finally found this one - been using it for years: http://acapsoft.com/det.php?prog=Egg The best thing is how few clicks it takes to start/reset a timer.

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I also do the 42 minute thing. A good amount of time to concentrate, but not so long that you are "out of touch" with people that you are communicating with.

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Do you use the free time for HN/mail or you really leave the computer to change your mind to that other working mode you mentioned the other day?

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I've been using the Pomodoro Technique for a while, and it's proven to be a really great tool.

In fact, I liked it so much, I decided to build my next webapp around it. We're still working on it, but a beta should be out in a few weeks. Sign up for it here: http://www.pomodoroplanner.com

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I wonder if it'd be helpful to have a daily mindfulness meditation practice on the same timing schedule used for work.

ie, if you work for 25 minutes ala pomodoro, then in the morning or evening do a 25 minute sitting. If you do 42 minutes of work, do a 42 minute per sitting.

It'd be one more thing every day to help train yourself into focusing during the work periods.

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I generally sit when something disturbing happens. Extremely useful practice, from both a spiritual and a productivity perspective.

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Same with me. I tend to use sitting as a way to let go of something frustrating/troublesome that came up while working on something.

It's makes getting back to work much easier.

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I wrote a Pomodoro Webapp not too long ago ..

http://www.tomato-timer.com

if you use chrome, it has desktop notifications .. and I added a start/stop to timer..

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I do 60/20, most of the time.

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