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"internet platforms", "organize", "promote", "large amounts", "uploaded by their users", "in order to make a profit".

These phrases by themselves are open to interpretation in various ways. In particular, what I find dangerous is that these appear to be specific enough to convince people to believe there will be little to no room for abuse, and yet are vague enough to allow a motivated political actor to target someone if they really decided to.




Indeterminate legal concepts are very common, I don't know why this is always brought up as soon as it's "about the internet".


Programmers like to plan for every possible state and define things in the most technical, specific way possible.

Legislation is written contrariwise, which can seem baffling to programmers unfamiliar with the system.


Are you talking about directives in the E.U.? Or the law of a specific E.U. country?

It doesn't seem to be like this in the US. If you look at laws in the US, they try to define every word and every situation with a lot of cases. Vagueness seems to be avoided, and I'd say it actually doesn't seem too unfamiliar to programmers if used to the jargon


My response was in reaction to the parent comment brushing aside the level of ambiguity in the statement, and labelling it as "surprisingly reasonable" based on just another subjective interpretation of it.

As for vagueness, the issue has more to do with the scope. To me, as a citizen, the expanse of a given law is over the union of every possible interpretation of it that can be made by a reasonable person.

The more vague the language in a given law, the larger the scope for interpretation; the more specific and descriptive the language, the more restricted the scope.

It seems like an abdication of responsibility by duly elected legislators to leave the interpretation of the bounds of a vague law onto a far-removed, indirectly-elected judiciary, rather than passing specific laws defining those bounds more carefully from the get go. Why not just create a single law "Enforce good. Punish evil.", and leave it to the courts to implement?

As for why this uproar happens specifically on topics regarding the internet, the audience here on HN has a larger interest in everything to do with it compared to other issues. I do think that the same level of caution should be applied w.r.t. any and all vague laws, regardless of the topic.


Because it's often applied across borders, and in cases of late, potentially by independent bodies of different countries. IME, it's often brought up on any large set of laws, especially those governing freedom of information, and why most people discourage large encompassing new laws over meager ones or none at all.

The real question is why people take the it's-very-common approach to belittle people's concerns.


Being open just means that the judiciary has the room to make it work as cases emerge. Suggesting that this stuff would be politicised - what, the ECJ? - seems unlikely, although I'd be open to hearing of examples of blatant political interference in the EU-wide judicial process.


Is this a joke? Judicial activism by the ECJ even has its own wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judicial_activism_in_the_Europ...

A political court is essential to the european project. Absolutely essential.


> DMCA: there will be no abuse

https://www.theverge.com/2015/6/18/8803571/sunday-times-inte...

> GDPR: there will be no abuse

https://euobserver.com/justice/143343

> Art. 13; there will be no abuse

yeah, let's be optimistic!


[paraphrase] You keep using that phrase "no abuse". I do not think it means what you think it means ... [/paraphrase]

Single paraphrased/modified quote from a movie, meant to mock the abuse that has, and surely will, happen, under the existing, and new regimes. Fair use, and parody all wrapped up in one sentence.




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