Hacker News new | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

I see some minor grammatical issues with the doc. "dependencies" is spelled wrong, and the final sentence of the "Docker Immutable Workstation" section seems incomplete. Also this line: "a Mac if we are lucky".. expect to be chirped at by non-cultists like myself :)

I do something similar but with a VM instead of a Docker container and it works well. The one thing I like about using a VM is it runs full Ubuntu with an init system, so it's easier to run daemons like Samba. My VM shares its home directory so I can mount it on the host and share files across the barrier (I've always found VM "shared folder" implementations flaky). Files are less an issue with Docker, but you might want to run other daemons within the context of your dev environment. The Docker "one executable per container" idiom really falls apart here, and requires you to hack around it.

To keep things fresh, I just have a couple bash scripts that I run (one for some system packages, one for dev tools, one for dotfiles) on a new Ubuntu VM every few months. I'm sure it would be trivial to automate this with vagrant to even further streamline it but it's been good enough for me.






> The one thing I like about using a VM is it runs full Ubuntu with an init system

You can get that functionality without full VM overhead by using:

- https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/systemd-nspawn

- https://www.freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/systemd-nsp...


Thanks.

yes the idea of long running daemons on the workstation seems at at odds with docker - something to get my head round I guess

As for more grammar ... aspell should be next addition to the Dockerfile


> I do something similar but with a VM instead of a Docker container and it works well. The one thing I like about using a VM is it runs full Ubuntu with an init system

You could get that with LXC/LXD containers [1].

[1] https://linuxcontainers.org/lxd/introduction/


You can even get it with straight up Docker, as long as both the host and container are running a new enough kernel+docker. You can even run unprivileged containers: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2016/09/13/running-system... - I did this with Ubuntu (Bionic and Artful, but I can't remember if it could work older versions, although this hardly new per the date on the blog). Of course this assumes you are running Linux everywhere and not some proprietary, limiting, OS.

In my experience, I was not able to run systemctl restart some.service in a docker container. This wasn't an issue in a LXC container.



Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: