Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

Sure, you definitely could; you'd sell the same cameras Ring sells, and a local server appliance maybe the size of a wireless router that they'd link to, sort of like how you buy Hue bulbs and also a Hue router.

You'd likely lose the following features:

* Access to the camera from your phone

* The ability to talk to people near the camera

* The "people detection" image classification stuff

* The ability to highlight a range of video and get a shareable link for it




* Access to the camera from your phone

A sane-default DNS configuration could get around this automatically. The default can be some managed thing like your-preferred-name.cameraservice.com and if you're particularly adventurous could be camera.yourdomain.com. IPv6 would greatly simplify the NAT complications here. A device that can double as a firewall or talk to one to auto configure would go a long way.

* The ability to talk to people near the camera

I don't see how the cloud is necessary for this other than slightly simplifying notification. Can't the box at your house just shoot off a text message with a link? A centralized notification service could be used here that contains only a message along the lines of "there is activity at your camera" and the phone app can initiate the stream directly.

* The "people detection" image classification stuff

How hard is this really? Once the model/algorithm is in place the actual computation is easy right? Do they really have to run in the cloud?

* The ability to highlight a range of video and get a shareable link for it

This can be done with either a share-to-youtube link for videos you don't mind making public or simply direct links to your device for small audiences.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: