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I did the transition and made mistakes on the way. I'm probably not that great a leader so you can take this with a pinch of salt. What would have helped me at the time was:

You will probably be a bit incompetent at first but that is part of the process. Maybe keep a diary of interactions you have with the team so that at the end of each day you can reflect on what you might have done differently. It's ok as long as your always striving to improve.

One of my main goals as tech leader is it get people to stay at the company! To do this you should know what your direct reports personal aspirations are, and have a clear future plan you have both decided on to get them there. You should both be reviewing this all the time.

Don't assume things about people, just ask. Some people actually like being micro-managed! Although, try to give your good people freedom within boundaries/budgets/constraints, get them to come to you if they want to go outside those boundaries. Give your bad people explicit tasks, set appropriate deadlines for them, coach them to be good people.

Try and delegate everything that you think can be handled by a team member (and they want to do it) and isn't personal development. Don't be laissez faire about it, if you delegate to someone write it down and check-in with them at an appropriate time about the task. Be disappointed when they don't complete the task in the agreed time.

You might think you have to be the charismatic leader who can inspire people to eat shit all the time but that is just not true. There are many different styles of leadership. In sales for example you can go far with contingent reward. There is also a lot of bollocks written about leadership so try and stick to facts when learning. I thought this was a good overview but YMMV https://www.amazon.co.uk/Science-Leadership-Lessons-Research....




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