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On the contrary, literate programming is heavily used in notebook environments (ipython, RMarkdown, Mathematica, etc) and in practice, code structured this way seems to implode once it gets above a few kloc. Narratives just don't seem to do a good job of hierarchy / modularization / separation of responsiblity, which is the key to programming in the large.



> literate programming is heavily used in notebook environments (ipython, RMarkdown, Mathematica, etc)

Do any of those actually implement Literate Programming as DK intended? As in "you can move the code around to wherever makes most sense for your narrative"? As best I know, almost all "literate programming" today is just the intermingling of code and text blocks (e.g. Docco et al) in the same order the code would have to be anyway (i.e. there's no TANGLE, only WEAVE.)


Note that literate programming and "modularization/separation" are both techniques for organizing your code, but they aren't mutually exclusive (though I understand the temptation to use only one). (Aside: what are now called "sections" in literate programming were originally called "modules".) (Disclaimer: I'm not sure I know what you mean by literate programming in notebook environments.)




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