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I think that's a couple of years old. If you want more modern info, I think https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ME4RhxwPO5A (skip to about 8m30) is pretty good, as is https://code.fb.com/open-source/linux/. We also talk a lot about the benefits of having cgroup2 work well with BTRFS, which (imo) isn't something that particularly matters with administrative systems, but more for data processing/serving systems. I don't think we've released numbers or percentages, but it's safe to say every request you make to Facebook.com is processed by 1 or more machines with a btrfs filesystem. We've got a ton of value out of it, I hope we talk more about its successes publicly soon :)

(I work at fb)




Here's 8:23 pre-queued: https://youtu.be/ME4RhxwPO5A?t=503

That video's discussing btrfs layering, which is very neat.

I am _very_ curious what sort of experience FB has had with btrfs.

If FB has decided to go all-in with btrfs, you probably have the most accurate raw data there is to have.

Of course, any hyper-scale deployment of a technology is going to produce remarkable/exponential statistics, and these will (sadly/annoyingly) need careful parsing to normalize in a way that is generally accessible and unsurprising. (We live in a very knee-jerk world, and all. Sigh)

All this to say, I at least am looking forward to whatever sorts of numbers you end up being able to share.

--

After considering the bit about btrfs in the video, and your mention of "1 or more machines", I wonder if you aren't using btrfs on things like load balancer type systems - or, more abstractly, node configurations that can always safely be "thrown away", whether by hardware failure or explicit decommission. But then I realize the chances are you probably use such a model (individual hardware failure must be acceptable; everything important must be n-way redundant) because nothing else makes sense at scale. And then I wonder... exactly what point in that spectrum does btrfs fit in? I wonder if/how you can answer that question.




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