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These are all uses for Bitcoin, not uses for general blockchain tech, so they're not "additional" uses. But for what it's worth, I think Bitcoin itself is superfluous, being covered almost entirely by:

- Gift cards

- PayPal

- Credit Cards

- Cash / Cashier's Checks / Certified Checks / Money Orders / Wire Transfers

It wasn't at all necessary to build Bitcoin, with its planet-destroying proof of work energy usage, to pay for porn. And besides, the essence of anonymous payments using Bitcoin is the tumbler, not Bitcoin itself (which is super easy to track, precisely because it's got a blockchain).

P.S. If your "leaving Venezuela with your wealth intact" is a "national currencies can be unstable" argument, remember that Bitcoin is extremely unstable and has no system in place to regulate or stabilize it. In fact, because it's often at odds with government monetary policy, there's a base instability that will never go away.




You're right I was simply talking about cryptocurrencies.

The point is cryptocurrencies is simply better at the use cases I presented. You're welcome to come with a better alternative, the ones you list simply doesn't cut it.

> It wasn't at all necessary to build Bitcoin

Actually Bitcoin was built to address the print on demand fiat currency driven by debt and unaccountable fractional reserve driven economy we have today. Giving people the ability to actually own their money for real and not just IOUs.

That digital cash is an excellent use case to pay for porn online is just a coincidence, never the purpose.

> with its planet-destroying proof of work energy usage

As opposed to the planet-destroying energy consumption of the fiat institution today? Or the tobacco industry? Or the military? Or any number of stupid usages of energy (which dwarfs the Bitcoin usage) we have today?

That it's somehow "planet-destroying" is just ignorant. It may be inefficient but it's self regulating and it cannot increase endlessly.

> And besides, the essence of anonymous payments using Bitcoin is the tumbler, not Bitcoin itself

Please see Monero or the shielded transactions of ZCash for how real anonymous payments look.

Also the pseudo-anonymous nature of Bitcoin is already better than the precise data we give credit card companies today.

> remember that Bitcoin is extremely unstable and has no system in place to regulate or stabilize it

Bitcoin is very volatile yes. Yet it's amazingly stable compared to the inflation of 4000% in Venezuela. It will also become more stable as it becomes adopted more.


> Actually Bitcoin was built to address the print on demand fiat currency driven by debt and unaccountable fractional reserve driven economy we have today. Giving people the ability to actually own their money for real and not just IOUs.

Bitcoin only has value because it can be turned into those fiat currencies, and is thus only valuable as an extension of them. So either Bitcoin is worthless, or it's essentially a super-encumbered fiat currency. Unlike basically everything else, it's neither a service nor a commodity. So sure, insofar as you can own ones and zeros you can own Bitcoin. But it doesn't matter _at all_ if you can't turn it into Dollars.

> As opposed to the planet-destroying energy consumption of the fiat institution today? Or the tobacco industry? Or the military? Or any number of stupid usages of energy (which dwarfs the Bitcoin usage) we have today?

This is all whataboutism.

> It may be inefficient but it's self regulating and it cannot increase endlessly.

By "self regulating" do you mean "requires more and more energy use to add new blocks"? That's not very comforting. Plus "it cannot increase endlessly" isn't an argument that inspires faith. "Sure the flu might claim a lot of lives. But it can't claim _all_ of them." See?

> Please see Monero or the shielded transactions of ZCash for how real anonymous payments look.

Please see Visa gift cards for how everyone on earth pays anonymously for things online. We didn't need any of that stuff. As a cool bonus, it's extremely unlikely that the $100 you spend on the card won't turn into $50 because a foreign government shut down a Bitcoin exchange.

> it's amazingly stable compared to the inflation of 4000% in Venezuela. It will also become more stable as it becomes adopted more.

I think it would be a bad idea to denominate your wealth in the currency of an unstable government. I also think it would be a bad idea to denominate your wealth in a currency with no regulation and no backing whatsoever. The only good idea here is to denominate your wealth in a currency backed and regulated by a stable, liberal government.




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