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I feel while a learning methodology may make it go faster, what matters more is having the intrinsic motivation to actually get started and keep going (especially when you hit roadblocks).

What works for me is having a project or goal I'm excited about. That motivates me to learn the skills and knowledge to achieve it. Back in my teens, I really wanted to customize a Neopets guild (remember those? ;) ) so I started learning HTML to be able to. After, it was "I really want my own site" so I learned PHP to customize Wordpress and so on.

When I was in school and some of the information I had to learn wasn't directly applicable, I made a game out of testing study techniques. Such as taking annotated screenshots out of Youtube videos (10x better than textbook diagrams and walls of text). This game (which was really about changing my own perception from "ugh, rote memorization" to "let's test study techniques") helped me through the denser materials.




(Sorry to nitpick, but) I think you mean "learning method"? A method is a method; a methodology is the reasons, rationale, explanation for why you've used that particular method. I see this error everywhere, although it's much longer and incorrect. I guess it sounds/looks impressive, kinda scientific.


Is it really an error if everything from Google to Merriam-Webster apparently makes it?

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/methodology

> a body of methods, rules, and postulates employed by a discipline : a particular procedure or set of procedures

I.e. methodology is a set of methods.


I didn't quite understand your question, but yes it's really an error. No, that's not what methodology means. Although if everyone uses it to mean the same as method, as seems increasingly the case, then that will be what it means and be printed in dictionaries. Personally, I like short words and think they should be preferred, besides the two concepts being entirely different.


> Although if everyone uses it to mean the same as method, as seems increasingly the case, then that will be what it means and be printed in dictionaries.

As far as I've ever heard or seen this word used, "methodology" is used to mean "a set of methods". Maybe you're a bit confused by the fact that a method can be usually destructured into sub-methods - or conversely, a "methodology" is just a single method in the set of methods one meta-level up.




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