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There weren't many other communities when that page was written. If they were, they weren't well-known.

At the very least, the only one I've heard of is on newsgroups, and most of what I hear about that is that if you asked a question some Norwegian guy would flame you so hard you would actually die.

The best resource would be a practical tutorial as easy to follow as Learn You A Haskell, or at least a language subset as easy to learn as quickly as C - C being, of course, the best language ever invented.

If people get stuck at the level where they're just capable of arguing about the loop macro, maybe you should get rid of the loop macro, or at least not let them know about it.




Good point about the age of the page. From what I've observed, things have changed a bit in the last ten years or so, no argument there.

"Learn You A Haskell" is very good, and I haven't seen anything like it for Common Lisp. However, Peter Seibel's "Practical Common Lisp" is quite close in terms of target audience, and also very good.

I won't argue with the assertion that Common Lisp is hard to learn. PCL, pg's "ANSI Common Lisp" and "On Lisp", and "Let Over Lambda" that I've mentioned are a good start, but it can be difficult to get from the text book knowledge to good, practical, useful programs.

That said, I don't think that it's the fault of Common Lisp. C is easy to learn because it is small, but it is also C. (I'm programming C and Ruby in my day job, and I love C, but there are times when I wish it had more of the expressive and abstractive power of Ruby or Common Lisp.) Common Lisp is hard to learn, but once you've learned it you get to program in Common Lisp.

Regarding LOOP: some people consider integral calculus difficult to learn. Does that mean we should excise it from mathematics, or at least not let high school students know about it? LOOP is part of the standard, so it's not going away any time soon.


'"Learn You A Haskell" is very good, and I haven't seen anything like it for Common Lisp.'

It's actually inspired by Conrad Barski's 'Casting SPELs in Lisp' (http://www.lisperati.com/casting.html), which in turn was inspired by Why's Guide to Ruby (I think). Conrad Barski actually wrote a Haskell comic book tutorial that predates 'Learn you a Haskell' (http://lisperati.com/haskell/). Not only that, but Conrad's full-length Lisp tutorial comic book, Land of Lisp, is due to hit the shelves in four days: http://www.amazon.com/Land-Lisp-Learn-Program-Game/dp/159327...


Thanks for those links!


"At the very least, the only one I've heard of is on newsgroups, and most of what I hear about that is that if you asked a question some Norwegian guy would flame you so hard you would actually die."

That's the most hilarious description of comp.lang.lisp ever. Yeah, it's pretty much like Mad Max when it comes to programming language communities. Now minus Erik Naggum and plus a lot of spam.




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