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The key difference between die forever and recovery (which sometimes comes with another hype cycle) is the underlying utility/value of the thing. Real estate in places people actually want to live will "always" recover, because there's underlying value in somewhere to live (but people may not always want to live in the same places). Video games came back because decent games are fun. 3D movies seem to come back for another round of hype cycle every so often, but they don't seem to offer enough real value to offset the cost of producing them or viewing them, so we're kind of in the stable and stagnant phase. Crystal Pepsi and other clear colas obviously have no redeeming value, so it's probably not coming back again.

A lot of the companies in video games around the time of the blow up are gone now, but some of them survived -- Nintendo was early and is still around, Sega survived until much after the crash. The crash wasn't good for Atari, but it sort of survived into the 90s, and it had a lot of corporate shenanigans too. It doesn't seem that unusual that so many companies in a field aren't around 30 years later.

Re: cryptocurrencies, who knows, but the real question is if they're really useful compared to traditional banking, for enough people for it to offset the tremendous escalating costs of running the network.




> A lot of the companies in video games around the time of the blow up are gone now, but some of them survived -- Nintendo was early and is still around, Sega survived until much after the crash.

Wait, but the Famicom wasn't even released until 1983 (the year of the crash), and the Genesis wasn't released until '88, so it seems like those companies really rose from the ashes of the crash - even though Nintendo had been dabbling in video games since the 70s, the Famicom was their first attempt to really hit the US market it seems.

> Re: cryptocurrencies, who knows, but the real question is if they're really useful compared to traditional banking, for enough people for it to offset the tremendous escalating costs of running the network.

Don't mistake this by any means as me being a fanatic, because by no means am I anything less than incredibly skeptical of cryptocurrencies: I question whether it's just because nothing has really managed to prove that fruitful yet in comparison to the overwhelming use of them now as speculative investments.

For example, we had to send a payment to someone who lives in a commonwealth country - what a pain in the ass that was. For the first time I actually saw a use for bitcoin, but the volatility and my general desire not to run afoul of any weird money laundering laws got the better of me.


Most of the other companies dabbling in video games in the 70s and early 80s simply slowed dabbling. Ex Mattel didn't release any follow on consoles of note past the Itellivision, Coleco went on to focus more on Cabbage Patch Kids and a failing home computer after the Coleco Vision. But who didn't have a failing home computer back then?

Nintendo and Sega continued to focus on them, during the downturn. Not a lot of people were really doing video games only then, Atari was a division of Warner Entertainment by the end of the 70s.

Re crypto, international transfer does seem like an area that's poorly served and expensive with traditional banking, and family remittances is a huge submarket there, but it's only rarely mentioned in articles about bitcoin. I think the trick is there needs to be enough market activity to make bitcoins available for purchase in the sending country and sellable in the receiving country. But there's some competition here from PayPal and others.


>the Genesis wasn't released until '88,

Sega released the SG-1000 on literally the same day as the Famicom's launch. In 1985 they introduced the Sega Master System, an upgraded SG-1000.


Oops! You are correct, though it looks like the SG-1000 was never released outside of JP. Still, not pre-crash.


> Crystal Pepsi and other clear colas obviously have no redeeming value

I'm one of the mutants that actually likes Chrystal Pepsi. :-\


You're probably in this group: https://arstechnica.com/science/2015/12/certain-customers-sp...

Sorry (and welcome)


Interesting read.

I wish they had a list of products, though. I wonder if there are any other failed products I've loved, or if liking Crystal Pepsi is kind of a one-off.




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