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Scientists assessed the options for growing nuclear power. They are grim (vox.com)
16 points by spenrose 5 months ago | hide | past | web | favorite | 4 comments



Abstract of the referenced (and paywalled) PNAS article:

"Nuclear power holds the potential to make a significant contribution to decarbonizing the US energy system. Whether it could do so in its current form is a critical question: Existing large light water reactors in the United States are under economic pressure from low natural gas prices, and some have already closed. Moreover, because of their great cost and complexity, it appears most unlikely that any new large plants will be built over the next several decades. While advanced reactor designs are sometimes held up as a potential solution to nuclear power’s challenges, our assessment of the advanced fission enterprise suggests that no US design will be commercialized before midcentury. That leaves factory-manufactured, light water small modular reactors (SMRs) as the only option that might be deployed at significant scale in the climate-critical period of the next several decades. We have systematically investigated how a domestic market could develop to support that industry over the next several decades and, in the absence of a dramatic change in the policy environment, have been unable to make a convincing case. Achieving deep decarbonization of the energy system will require a portfolio of every available technology and strategy we can muster. It should be a source of profound concern for all who care about climate change that, for entirely predictable and resolvable reasons, the United States appears set to virtually lose nuclear power, and thus a wedge of reliable and low-carbon energy, over the next few decades."



How much good does putting the capital for a new nuclear power plant into gridscale energy storage do?


Those investments are happening anyway because they make sense on their own terms.

"batteries have a slate of use cases and multiple value propositions; with costs declining, analysts say there is much more capacity on the way."

https://www.utilitydive.com/news/eia-700-mw-of-utility-scale...




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