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I think it is about legal culpability. If I am running CentOS in my datacenter, there is some degree of confidence that the packages were rebuilt by the CentOS team, a few members of which are Redhat employees. Redhat have an obligation to make reasonable effort to keep malicious code out of their supported software.

If there is a commercially supported version of Debian, then the same would apply.

If I pull in RPM's, Containers, VM Images built by Joe Random, I am legally on my own. My customers will be furious when they find out I have done this and the court will say that I did not make reasonable effort to protect my customers.




> Redhat have an obligation to make reasonable effort to keep malicious code out of their supported software.

No. read the license terms. For all Linux distro, there is a clear mention that the software is provided as is, and they are in no way responsible for whatever happens with it. Very standard. So absolutely no legal standing and therefore no obligation.


There’s a social and economic understanding that Redhat works hard to keep malicious code out of their distributions.

That doesn’t exist with containers pulled from joevandyk/postgresql.


That is specific to the Linux code itself which is taken from upstream. Linux distro vendors provide a contractual relationship with their customer base that provide SLA's around patching security defects and bugs. They also enforce policies around uptake of new third party code. They also do extensive patching of all of their packages to mitigate the vulnerabilities that upstream providers do not patch. There is much more to this that would take a blog entry to explain.


> That is specific to the Linux code itself which is taken from upstream.

No, I don't believe that's the case.

> Linux distro vendors provide a contractual relationship with their customer base that provide SLA's around patching security defects and bugs.

I don't think many - if any - GNU/Linux distro vendors provide anything like that.

RHEL may - it's been a while since I've read a RH contract - but most distributions, as noted by parent, make it quite clear in the licence agreement that everything is provided as is and is sold without any warranty or assurance of suitability etc.

> They also enforce policies around uptake of new third party code.

Is third party code here the same as 'upstream' in the first take? 99% of most distributions code is 'third party' or 'upstream' in the sense it comes from people other than distribution maintainers.

> They also do extensive patching of all of their packages to mitigate the vulnerabilities that upstream providers do not patch.

I know Debian does this, and I trust them with the process. I'm not a big fan of RedHat, but I also know they have an excellent reputation on this front.

It doesn't change the fact that licences clearly put responsibility on the user not the distributor.


For commercial software, there may be some level of legal liability, but it would depend entirely on your contract, and I'd imagine if you look at most standard contracts, they disclaim all such liability.

For CentOS (or any other open source software) you may have that confidence but you have no contract :)

Now do Redhat/Debian package maintainers do detailed security reviews on all the software they distribute... I don't know but the odds would say it's not likely as they don't employ (to the best of my knowledge) the number of code review professionals that would be required to do that.

And of course as soon as you venture off in to other repo's (npm, rubygems, CPAN, nuget etc) you're entirely on your own.


I agree, I am riding on the backs of people using RHEL. There is a direct contractual relationship between those companies and Redhat. In my case, I am relying on the other companies having that relationship and I can still say some effort is being made to validate the supported packages. While I can not sue anyone, I can say that I am using an OS that has some degree of code validation and feature set stability.

For sure, things like npn, gems, cpan, pear, pip, etc... is basically back to square one with Joe Random. Each of those things can be pulled into a code repo, built internally and turned into RPM packages. I agree that the effort to code diff review these things is quite large. It is likely still a smaller effort than rewriting all of this code from scratch.


As to code review effort being lower than writing, sure in most cases (although finding well hidden backdoors is likely harder than writing software)

That said even at less effort there it seems extremely unlikely that anyone is doing actual code reviews on the software being packaged up into all the Linux repo's out there. Even automated static analysis over that volume of code (as error ridden as that would be) just isn't practical.

That's not to say they're not more trusted than npm et al, as the developer can't push directly to the repo., so an attackers life is more complex.

Although that said it does introduce a new possibility, that of the malicious/compromised package maintainer...


> although finding well hidden backdoors is likely harder than writing software

Very likely:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underhanded_C_Contest


Are you basing your assertions on a discussion with an attorney, or better yet, a written legal opinion, or is this your interpretation as a lay person?

To date, I have yet to see a software contract that absorbs any legal culpability. Not even high 3-comma annual renewals. The way culpability is usually handled is a clause demanding information security and/or data privacy insurance in client-vendor Master Services Agreements. If your experience with reading business contracts is different, and you've seen actual absorption of legal risk, then please tell some war stories of the contexts, as I'm always up for learning how others do business.


I am not a lawyer and this is not level advice.

I am referring to after you have been breached, your data has been lost and your CEO and CFO are standing before the judge. The judge will make some punitive decisions based on what effort you can show you made to protect your customers.

If your devs are grabbing every shiny gidget widget from Joe Random and you did not make attempts, as a company, to protect your investors and uphold your fiduciary responsibilities, then the hammer will come down much harder.


> ...your CEO and CFO are standing before the judge.

This doesn't happen often, and you more commonly see lower-level line staff or managers standing in court because the high-level executives simply point to the written company policies their legal team advised b put in place that forbid such wanton behavior. Now indictment not to speak of prosecution has to clear the far higher bar to show that such high-level executives deliberately, consciously structured incentives such that meeting such policies was outright impossible.

Issuing a policy that demands any such conflicts be raised immediately to management neatly short-circuits such prosecution strategies. Unless the executives are particularly careless or brazen, it is worth more to the prosecution to go after lower-level staff.

I believe that it helps if legal precedent can be set such that management is held more accountable for behavioral structuring through incentives and selective policy enforcement.




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