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I don't think the loop is necessarily bad, it shows progress.

Think about Java, it solved a class of problems that C was unable to address (e.g. unsafe memory, native threads). Thus enabling a new class of programs. But the new class of programs created opportunities for new platforms to solve with the benefit of a clean slate and fresh design having learned from past successes and failures.




I'm increasingly sketical. Maybe we move ahead a few inches each cycle, but it's starting to look distressingly like each generation of programmers has to learn all the lessons that their greybeard predecessors learned the hard way. Then, when they acheived some level of enlightenment, the next batch of bright-eyed whippersnappers comes along to rinse and repeat.

There's a disturbingly low-level of historical knowledge passed along in programming. Some bits and pieces are encountered in a quality Computer Science curriculum, but usually in rarefied, theoretical form, and inevitably balkanized into drips and drabs as part of subject-oriented coursework.


It's interesting to place today's techs on the Java maturation timeline - each became what they thought they hated but realized may have existed for some necessary reasons.

New platforms bring exciting and meaningful evolution often at the cost of what techs like .net and Java have a few decade advantage in. It's also interesting to see what Java devs are innovating with themselves, Scala, Kotlin both have good things happening.

Maybe using one large, inter-syntax friendly world like JVM will help.

When experience is overlooked for youth, we relearn and reimplement the same libraries repeatedly in every new tech to feed some developers needs to build temples to their greatness.

Still, Fitzgeralds quote comes to mind... "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." and technology is held back by reinventing the wheel.


The biggest problem i see is the weird hole circa 2006 that arranges with Sun selling to Oracle, that kind of still-birthed Java as the next great language.

That hole I can credit as giving C# the advantage in that tight niche, and stilling the development of the JVM platform in general.

By the time that the rust on JVM improvements were dusted off, all initiative was lost. Java was playing catchup to the competition.


On the other hand, Oracle has probably developed Java further much more and kept Maxime around making it into Graal.

IBM gave up on the first counter proposal, Red-Hat and Google didn't bother to rescue Sun.

So we might even have been left with either Java 6 or being forced to port our applications.


As we're seeing with WhatsApp, guardianship and supporting the direction of a project isn't easy. I'm not sure where Java would have ended up if someone else took it.


Additionally Oracle haters seem to forget Oracle was one of the very first companies to get into bet with Sun regarding Java, with their whole Java based terminals idea and porting all their Oracle Database GUIs to Swing.




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