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Yes, arguably the .NET Framework almost did it and is still one of the most productive frameworks available, but .NET Core has definitely improved things substantially. It's fast, well-designed, and full-featured and I expect usage to pick up greatly.



What I don't like in Microsoft's frameworks is that they've made lots of things multiple times in slightly different variations, like they always do with all their software (10 variations of each type of programs which were outdated before they were finished). Mostly it exists due to historical reasons, but it only underlines the problem of a multi-billion corporation having design skills of a sophomore. They redo and redo things, bloating their frameworks and increasing their number and you have to guess which CookieContainer you should use this time. It makes me understand why language designers like Rust developers insist on a small core library. Because it's better to have one separate library that will do everything regarding Cookie management (and you could control its functionality by including additional traits from it), than to have incompatible variations of it in the standard library and in each framework.


Android Frameworks will make you love .NET variations.


So far the package manager hell has been kept in check because they keep re-doing everything in such a way that you don't intermingle it. So when you're on MVC5 you're on MVC5, and when you're on AspNetCore, you're on that. You're not using 5 of library x and 6 of libarary Y. Likewise the startup and DI stuff has all fully rebooted twice in a few years. But nonetheless, some of that sort of package hell has already seeped in, where you're using different packages that depend on different versions of some underlying thing with breaking changes. I think the choices are either keep rebooting everything or stop making new stuff.


Yes, but it's rapidly getting better with .NET Standard combining all the libraries into a single definition that can be used on any framework implementation.

MVC5 was never released though, and the changes have been rather minimal from ASP.NET Core v1 to v2 with straightforward migration guides, so it might look messier than it actually is if you were working through all the previews and release candidates instead.

Nevertheless, Microsoft has a long history of having messy v1.0 with most of the stability coming after v2.0, so you can consider the foundation pretty stable now that it's on v2.1 and more.


Can I use F# with it? Because I would love to learn me some F# some day.


F# with .NET Core? Yes, it works fine.

There are some challenges coming up with design changes to the compiler and C# that might overlap what F# already has but it'll get sorted out.


.net core F# support has been pretty great from the initial stages of .net core from my basic usage. Biggest challenge seemed to be around type providers (F# system of generating strongly typed classes from dynamic data such as XML, CSVs, HTTP etc) but that's largely resolved. More info at https://github.com/fsprojects/FSharp.TypeProviders.SDK

Great resources for getting started with F# at https://fsharp.org/

My personal preference is generally to install the SDK and use the http://ionide.io/ with VScode as it seems to work most reliably cross platform.


I'd be very much interested how anyone is using F# on Linux without mono.

I have .NET Core but the whole thing seems to require Mono and it isn't clear from fsharp.org that you can do without.





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