Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

Let me put it another way: what’s the point of these newfangled moving pictures when we already have books?



> Let me put it another way: what’s the point of these newfangled moving pictures when we already have books?

Yeah, figured that would be trotted out at some point. That's a fine sounding argument, but do you really feel emoji's are on the same level as the advent of video? I don't believe you do. At some point you have to take a look at the specific thing you're talking about and get down out of the clouds.

I have yet to hear a reasonable argument as to why emoji's are better. All I see here is "they're different and can be funny." Ok.


Why are you so intent on invalidating other people when they say that emoji help them communicate?


Am I not allowed to disagree with a statement that implies emojis are some groundbreaking form of communication? I never said the concept was not useful; I said that images provide nothing text cannot aside from aesthetics. Why are you people so defensive about this?


Because you have observed that emojis do not help you communicate, and then concluded that emojis cannot possibly help anyone communicate. There are lots of people in this thread who have mentioned concrete examples of emojis "providing something text cannot," and yet you refuse to accept it.

"This helps me communicate" is not a falsifiable claim. You're telling lots of people that they have somehow made a mistake in interpreting their own life experiences. You are not even considering the possibility that something is there, and you just can't see it.


They are an improvement to an existing form of communication. Aesthetics are also a form of communication. Emojis can be used as part of a sentence and there is no way to communicate exactly the same thing without using them.

There has never been a way to put images in a sentence as easy and expressive as emoji (all there used to be was fonts like Wingdings), and it’s standardized. That is quite revolutionary.


That's a better argument, but it still doesn't really explain what qualities make emoji a better medium of expression, or why we need 2000 of them.


The fact that they’re wildly popular should provide some indication that the qualities exist.

Communication is rife with ambiguities, emotion, shortcuts, and mistakes. And between people who share friendship or more personal relationships, those “flaws” are often features, not bugs.

The concept of emoji, I feel, embraces those flaws.

(And personally speaking on the subject of emoji vs common text shorthand, if I never see “lol” again it’ll be too soon.)


Many popular things are not quality things.

> (And personally speaking on the subject of emoji vs common text shorthand, if I never see “lol” again it’ll be too soon.)

Funny, I feel the same way about emoji. I dunno, maybe I'm too autistic to get it, but when people use emoji it makes me feel like I'm talking to a child who hasn't learned express themselves like an adult yet.


> The fact that they’re wildly popular should provide some indication that the qualities exist.

Really?

Pet rocks were wildly popular. Unhealthy foods are wildly popular. Cocaine is wildly popular (well maybe that's a stretch).

I think there's a correlation problem here. However, I think you're missing the point again; _what can I convey via an emoji that I cannot convey in ascii_? I have yet to see a single example, and that's what started the entire debate.


Pet rocks were popular for 5 minutes. Unhealthy foods are perpetually popular because they have the quality of tasting wonderful.

And neither of you tried to address the core argument I made in the parent, that emoji reflect the inherent messiness of personal communications and for that matter personal relationships.

The same reason it’s important (but inefficient) to tell someone you love them in nonverbal ways is the reason emoji are popular. We all appreciate communications that extend beyond the written word. Emoji is just another option among many for achieving that.


>And neither of you tried to address the core argument I made in the parent, that emoji reflect the inherent messiness of personal communications and for that matter personal relationships

And exactly zero people, including yourself, have been able to provide a single gle example where text fails to convey what an icon can. And, you, that was the entire subject of this discussion if you haven't noticed.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: