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I was not familiar with this case. He received a sentence of 41 months!

From wikipedia:

“noting that no circumvention of passwords had occurred and that only publicly accessible information was obtained”

My personal opinion is corporations have excessive influence over the US government.




Weevs long sentence probably has less to do with what he did, but how he behaved in court.


He did say "I hope they give me the maximum, so people will rise up and storm the docks", so they threw the book at him.


If we are going to have a flawed system, I’m glad when folks like this guy take the brunt of it.

What a nut job.

But yeah, accessing public information probably shouldn’t get you 41 Months in jail.


> What a nut job.

Agreed.

> If we are going to have a flawed system, I’m glad when folks like this guy take the brunt of it.

This is wrong on multiple levels.

1. It normalizes and makes it seem slightly more acceptable to have a flawed system;

2. This guy did not "take the brunt" of it. Plenty of other people — dangerous nut jobs and otherwise — have unjustly suffered similarly or worse at the hands of the US judicial system.

3. His conviction was later vacated and he was released.


Perhaps you misunderstood, perhaps not.

If our system fails 1/100 times, I’d rather it fail on a pool of people who include neo-Nazi trolls than, you, for instance.

I’m glad the conviction was overturned as well.


Punitive brutality (outdoor tent concentration camps, water-boarding, execution), locking up people for their beliefs, over-incarceration and “throwing away the key” mentality neither engenders reform nor a civilized society... it suggests normalization of psychopathy.


I don’t agree with any of those things.

However, I still hold a position that when a system fails, I’d rather it fail in the direction of Nazis.

But perhaps you are saying is that in a system with 1/100 failure, I might be less incentivized to fix the problem if the 1% end up being people I don’t like — that seems to be an incentive to be aware of.

I don’t think someone should go to jail for accessing public data (or for being stupid and having “neoNazi” beliefs). I’d vote for laws to correct such problems in the system.

However, as a human, when the system fails, I’d prefer it fail in the direction of Nazis.

Perhaps I have room to mature or grow in this area, I’m open to it.


You keep saying "when the system fails, I’d prefer it fail in the direction of Nazis". That statement is not much different from "When cancer strikes, I’d prefer it strike one of the Nazis."

Neither cancer nor the US judicial system's unfairness discriminate towards Nazis. Your sentiment, "when the system fails, I’d prefer it fail in the direction of Nazis", goes nowhere because when the system fails, it does not look for Nazis to fail in the direction of. There's just no connection between the two parts of your statement.




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