Hacker News new | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit login

Interestingly, I often experience a somewhat opposite effect.

A lot of interactions with clerks are template-based, i.e., they follow the exact same flow every time. In case of McDonald's, the standard interaction for buying a burger may go roughly like this:

    Customer: A big mac, please.
    Clerk: Would you like some french fries with that?
    Customer: No, thank you.
    Clerk: Would you like a soft drink with your burger?
    Customer: No, thank you.
    Clerk: For here or to go?
    Customer: To go, please.
However, I found that I can't shortcut this conversation even if I give all the required information right at the beginning, which annoys me quite a bit. The interaction would then go something like this:

    Customer: A big mac, please, no french fries or drink, to go.
    Clerk: Would you like some french fries with that?
    Customer: *sigh* - No, thank you.
    Clerk: Would you like a soft drink with your burger?
    Customer: No, thank you.
    Clerk: For here or to go?
    Customer: To go, please.
Too bad, the clerk process insists on reading all information from stdin instead of using the provided command line parameters.



It's a protocol, just like TCP/IP. Your extraneous information in the header was just discarded. :-)


It's because they are obliged to ask these questions anyway, because someone has an idea that it'd maximize the sales.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: