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Maybe not in this particular article/thread, but it's been widely discussed how starting a family can be disruptive to a woman's career and professional development. The reasons it's disruptive could be due to companies / culture in general not being flexible and accommodating enough to motherhood. Taking time off from your career tends to be a very costly proposition in our current time.

For these reasons, there's lots of pressure to delay starting a family, and it's no surprise that IVF has seen increased demand. Some companies (i.e. Facebook) even provide their female employees a benefit that covers freezing their eggs. This is somewhat controversial, as some would argue that Facebook (and other companies, and perhaps our culture in general) should instead focus on reducing the professional cost of starting a family.

Therefore, these findings about growing human eggs could have great significance. I have friends grappling with this issue right now, so I understand how this discovery could be a great help to them. I hope that provides some useful context...




>focus on reducing the professional cost of starting a family //

Few professions are important enough to spare a passing thought over compared to the importance of raising children IMO.

I mean Facebook? Do people working there, for example, really think social data mining for advertising is important in some way? Sure, income is important, but people don't say they want to protect their income, they always talk about career progression (which is conceptually unrelated).

We've got plenty of people, making ways for people to sacrifice everything to a job without failing to reproduce seems pretty counter to any need.


This is part of a deeper problem in certain parts of America whereby one's personal value is determined entirely by one's net worth (and perhaps also education).


That’s not an American problem - it’s everywhere.


There are many parts of the world, even parts of America, where for a single woman or married couple to choose to remain childless in the pursuit of wealth would lower their social value more than the extra wealth would increase it.


>>The reasons it's disruptive could be due to companies / culture in general not being flexible and accommodating enough to motherhood.

That's a pretty critical view of things. I think a more objective view is that motherhood is costly for the mother in time and attention, and generally reduces the time and effort she puts into her career.

Whether people operating in the business world should be encouraged or forced to give preferential treatment to mothers so that motherhood doesn't become a career disadvantage is an open question. One could argue it would be unfair to those women who choose to forego or forestall motherhood to dedicate more time to their careers.




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