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It is off-putting how this story starts with the sort of morally-loaded rhetoric used to denigrate the indebted. Rhetoric that only is applied to the lower class, it should be noted.

He was offended at being labelled a "deadbeat" -- a term they use more than once -- and then a company wrote him a letter saying he never borrowed from them (despite the paragraph before saying he did, in fact, borrow from them [edit - my misreading on that. He doesn't know who he borrowed from]). Okay.

This was a company/group trying to criminally defraud people. Even in the legitimate debt realm there are criminal tactics to attempt to recover debt, usually after it has been written off and gone through multiple hands. The whole debt industry is a scumbag, shady industry, preying on the vulnerable. The debt/credit industry has an enormous number of punishers, from credit scores that can prevent you from getting a job to court-ordered remedies. They don't need the lobsters repeating their nonsense.




> then a company wrote him a letter saying he never borrowed from them (despite the paragraph before saying he did, in fact, borrow from them). Okay.

You misunderstood that paragraph.

He got a payday loan from an online lender, and paid it back promptly. The online lender was not Vista, the company to which his alleged debt purported to be owed.

*edited so I don't end a sentence with a preposition. I have no idea how by that slipped me.


N.B. ending an English sentence with a preposition is fine, c.f. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/ending-sentences-w... - it's just aping Latin style


I'm sure you didn't mean it, but your sentence could be interpreted that ending with a preposition is aping Latin. That particular tradition comes from English's Germanic roots. Latin languages typically have non-compound verbs which cover the same concepts.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrasal_verb


Yes, you're right. I wrote hurriedly and was ambiguous. I meant to say that the rule about not ending a sentence with a proposition is aping Latin style. Thanks!




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