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> I also think overwork is a byproduct of a globally connected society. Humans are happy if they are relatively well off compared to what they know. With smaller societies, we know less and thus expect less from ourselves and our situations. But it becomes more difficult to remain this way as small societies get replaced with large social networks.

This sort of logic is also part of why social media can be so damaging in general. Sites like Twitter, YouTube and Instagram heavily spotlight outliers who've become incredibly successful at their field, which will by definition make many people feel like failures in comparison.

And well, with most people being very image focused and only showing their successes on these sites, it can give the impression everyone else in the world is wildly successful while you're the only one struggling at all.

Still, that's something the internet reinforces in general really. That regardless of what you're interested in or seemingly good at, that there will always be hundreds or thousands better than you at it.




The glass half-full version of this is humans have an increased awareness and participation in pushing the limits of innovation, novelty and progress.

But yes, the half-empty version is the depressing awareness that you're not really "good" at anything.


One aspect of the half-empty version is that if you don't feel you're good at something it can discourage you from even trying to push the limits.

I think I've noticed this a bit in myself - before I had broadband internet I was more willing to play around and tinker with things, now I struggle a bit harder to find motivation to try anything I'm not already good at.


> That regardless of what you're interested in or seemingly good at, that there will always be hundreds or thousands better than you at it.

When I come across these people, rather than feeling inferior to them, I try to learn what I can from them so that I can do and be better the next time.

Feeling inferior is nothing more than an (likely false) acknowledgement that you don't want to be a lifelong learner.




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