Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

I think there were also more compatibility issues prior to 3.3 (when they started allowing u"") for libraries that did want to support both. It seems like the core team predicted that the most popular migration path for libraries would be `2to3` or something like that, when in fact the single-codebase-supporting-both strategy has been much more popular? Probably the transition would've been easier if everyone had seen that coming.



That's correct. If something like "six" would have been provided as part of 3.0, things would have went more smoothly. There could have been some language changes in 3.0 to make single-codebase easier. It was only later that the core developers realised that would be the normal way for libraries to support Python 3 (e.g allowing u prefix on strings in 3.x). Quite a bit of time was wasted while this got sorted out. Things are a lot better now. Soon, I think most people will stop worrying about 2.x backwards compatibility.


> Soon, I think most people will stop worrying about 2.x backwards compatibility.

Numpy is certainly not the only project with a plan to sunset Python 2 support: http://www.python3statement.org/#sections30-projects




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: