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In other words, the WiFi actually has 3 states: Off, Idle/disassociated/disconnected, and Connected/Associated. Most people have experienced all 3 states, but it seems Apple is under the impression that users are too stupid to know the difference between them...

The Wi-Fi will turn back full-on if you drive or walk to a new location. And both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth will turn back on at 5:00 AM. This is not clearly explained to users, nor left to them to choose, which makes security-aware users vulnerable as well.

Why 5:00 AM, and why only WiFi when location changes (and how far must the location change? That is not mentioned even on the Apple support page)? This set of conditions reminds me of the decisions taken by aircraft automation systems --- read how the Boeing autothrottle works, for example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autothrottle#Usage

Of course, the majority of iOS users have nowhere near that ability to memorise how this "automatic wireless control" works, so Apple doesn't bother to make the explanation prominent; which brings me to the next point: Apple products aren't designed for you. They're designed for the user Apple wants, and by not giving any choices to change the behaviour, Apple is gradually "creating an average user" by forcing them into compliance and causing the rest to a different platform.

To continue the analogy, Apple's design has all the complexity of aircraft automation, and works well for the ideal use case, but none of the transparency and predictability, nor the ability to turn it all off and "fly manually" when it fails.

Also, the original item on HN about this, https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15297387 , was rather ironically accompanied by this one submitted around roughly the same time: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15299165

The security aspect is not just a theoretical one.




Shape the user has been Apple's go to mentality since the first Mac...


Use Siri. Or use airplane mode. This isn’t that hard.

What’s the use case where you want to completely kill WiFi but not Bluetooth for “security?” If I am in a security sensitive environment, I use airplane mode. That’s it’s purpose: to completely shut down all radios.


Airplane mode also turns off cellular data.

Personally, I only want Bluetooth on when I'm intentionally using it, but having to go into settings to turn it on and off is cumbersome when I used to be able to toggle it from the control panel.


Actually, Airplane mode (thankfully) no longer disables wifi.


I just have to laugh at this entire thread. This is a clear example of Apple making a positive UX change for the vast majority of iOS users and it's completely invisible. Apple doesn't expect any user to "memorize" how this works. The support document is there to explain it to anyone who wants to know.

In exchange for triggering the OCD of some techies, Apple is going to save 99% of their customers time they would have spent troubleshooting why their Apple Watch or AirDrop or Handoff never work. And they'll probably save them money on their data bills as well.

This is a classic "Apple knows best" move and the only people who have a problem with it are the people who have always had a problem with Apple's SOP.


[EDIT: to all the people downvoting this, what do you think is incorrect about either of the two points I made?]

> the WiFi actually has 3 states: ... Most people have experienced all 3 states, but it seems Apple is under the impression that users are too stupid to know the difference between them.

...

Of course, the majority of iOS users have nowhere near that ability to memorise how this "automatic wireleas control" works

Hypocrisy much? It sounds like you're trying to seize any opportunity you can to bash Apple.




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