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So, these watches are all pre-sold and we can't buy one? When would be able to buy a watch with this innovative mechanism?



Eventually you will, hopefully it won't be as expensive as the gyrotourbillon that one is the most amazing mechanism I've seen.

https://youtu.be/lmxLAZZ2fhM

https://youtu.be/IQJTGPtYtqA


Wow, that is truly amazing, are there large versions of the gyrotourbillon out of interest, as in for a clock.


The thing about clocks is, they sit in only one position, so there's no justification for a tourbillon, which averages out the errors caused by change of position.


Wasn't one of the first tourbillon mechanisms in a carriage clock though?

I thought this was pretty cool regarding tourbillons: http://www.laimer.ch/laimer_tourbillon

I'm not sure what that would be classed as though.

Edit: Oh, doh, I misunderstood you, yeah I see what you mean


Yeah, that would make sense. And (googles) you can get a tourbillon clock in your carriage today -- if your carriage is a Bentley Bentayga.


Haha, awesome. Since the tourbillon spring mechanism seems to be constantly rotated with the gyro version, I wonder if there is another way to mechanically keep the tourbillon always level?


Wouldn’t that render it useless though? The purpose of tourbillon is specifically to cancel the effect gravity has on watches or clocks that are stationary. This was a problem with pocket watches that had a mechanism always in the same direction. Tourbillons in wrist watches are largely only for decorative purpose as the hands move and thus the gravity effect averages out.


Some number of tiny swinging weights could be used to establish the direction of gravity and the escapement could be slowly rotated until it's perpendicular to that direction. Edit: Or let the escapement hang. There's probably reasons why that's difficult.


The usual answer to these types of questions is “In 20 years, when the patent expires.


"Patent? What's that?" - an engineer in Shenzhen


They only made 10 of them.

I'm guessing they will make other watches with this movement eventually.


If you want a watch with a neat movement that is widely available, get a Swatch Sistem 51. Granted it has 5x as many moving parts as the Zenith Defy Lab, but it is actually affordable and pretty neat.


Although Watch Guy [0] was not amused...

[0] http://watchguy.co.uk/review-a-trip-inside-the-swatch-sistem...


Wow, that really is some serious cost-cutting. As he says none of the Chinese manufacturers have gone that far in cost-cutting; even their cheapest mechanical watches have a fully metal movement that is theoretically serviceable as normal (and some of them are really cheap).


This movement is the output of a combined R&D lab for LVMH watch brands (Tag, Zenith, Hublot, Bulgari). So the movement will likely to be rolled out to watches by all of those brands.


If the whole thing is mostly based on etched silicon shouldn't they be as cheap and common as CPUs? /s




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