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Getting Started with Swift on Windows (github.com)
86 points by hellofunk 13 days ago | hide | past | web | 17 comments | favorite





reads no

highlight: Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL)

WSL is only one option. As noted in another comment here:

The guide is split into separate sections for clang (cross-compiling), MSVC, clang-cl, and WSL. Compiled swift binaries can be native windows executables when using the non-WSL compilers.


"Note that all compiled Swift binaries are only executable within Bash on Windows and are Ubuntu, not Windows, executables."

The guide is split into separate sections for clang (cross-compiling), MSVC, clang-cl, and WSL. Compiled swift binaries can be native windows executables when using the non-WSL compilers.

Sorry, a misread on my part. Please ignore my comment, then.

That is a lot of work and fuss for 'Hello World'.

I mean, nice article, kudos. But 'just sayin' ...


Off topic, but the words "just saying" fill me with rage to the point where I am curious about my own psychological reaction. I suppose it has to do with the fact that it feels like a "free" way of putting something down without truly standing by ones words. Interesting..

I was wondering about rage, frustration, annoyance, et al recently.

I came to the conclusion that I experience all these things to varying degrees when the world does not conform to my mental model of how I want/expect it to be.


I'm spitting in your face without any reason but hey, it's just a prank bro. You can't hold me responsible.

That's what it says.


Everything starts with a hello world. It says your toolchain is at least working well enough to do some work.

Indeed, it's a black triangle[0]

> [T]he black triangle was a pioneer. It wasn’t just that we’d managed to get a triangle onto the screen. That could be done in about a day. It was the journey the triangle had taken to get up on the screen. It had passed through our new modeling tools, through two different intermediate converter programs, had been loaded up as a complete database, and been rendered through a fairly complex scene hierarchy, fully textured and lit (though there were no lights, so the triangle came out looking black). The black triangle demonstrated that the foundation was finally complete the core of a fairly complex system was completed, and we were now ready to put it to work doing cool stuff. By the end of the day, we had complete models on the screen, manipulating them with the controllers. Within a week, we had an environment to move the model through.

[0] http://rampantgames.com/blog/?p=7745


"Everything starts with a hello world. It says your toolchain is at least working well enough to do some work."

Of course it starts with hello world - but it shouldn't take a manual of byzantine scripts and dependencies to do it. This reeks of 'constant problems' in the platform - and this is before having to deal with Swift, which is a cool but fairly complex language - all before you can even focus on the problem one is trying to solve!

I think sometimes we nerds lose sight of the fact that we're trying to build stuff. Sometimes I think we equate complexity with intelligence, or see some noble value in doing hard things. When I think we should consider ourselves more like carpenters, building things. It's not science, it's just building decks - we want tools that work.

Anyhow, it's no slag on the author, it's pretty cool for him or her to have done this. My beef is with the nature of the complexity.


"it shouldn't take a manual of byzantine scripts and dependencies to do it" - I agree, and these hoops that early adopters are jumping through to make it work are things that will have to be addressed before it becomes accessible to the typical developer.

Bleeding edge vs cutting edge, I suppose. :)


This is only complex now. It used to be this complex to get GCC up off the ground. Now we just apt-get or yum install it. In time this will be the status quo for this and then you will just be able to type "make test" and it'll fart out the right binary.

It depends on what you want to do.

* If you want to be able to generate native Windows binaries with Swift than yes, it will take some time to build the tools (because Swift is not officially supported on Windows).

* If you just want to be able to learn and try Swift there is a simpler approach if you have Windows 10:

1. Install Windows System on Linux (WSL).

2. Go to swift.org and follow the instructions to install the latest binaries for Swift 4. Use the Ubuntu 16.04 instructions (this will work in a WSL window). You don't need to build Swift from sources in this case.

3. Use Swift under WSL.


Only for people with very short attention span! After installing, you just use it.



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