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A 65 year old programmer seems strange today because very few 65 year olds are even computer literate. I have to think that will change as time goes by (although I don't know far off 65 is for you).

That said, I'm pretty sure there are some CS professors that are 65; if they can hold that gig we should be able to crank out software (I hope)!




I'll let you know what it's like in a year {just turned 64 this month). I wrote my first programs in September 1963.

I don't have a great deal of money, but I do have enough coming in that most months I end with more than I started, and don't have to worry about starvation, foreclosure or eviction, and spend a fair amount on books and gadgets.

It's not a very exciting life, but I enjoy it most days, and it's been years since I had to listen to anybody telling me what to do.


It'd be great to hear more about your experiences over years. Do you have a blog or anything?


Seconding jawn's request for you to tell us more. if there's a something our community lacks, it's elders with some perspective.


blog blog blog! I would love to hear more from an elder "statesman" like yourself. What it's like for older folks in the field, getting hired, getting clients, etc.

Thank you.


That said, I'm pretty sure there are some CS professors that are 65; if they can hold that gig we should be able to crank out software (I hope)!

there's no concept of tenure outside of academia, though :/


Sure there is, it's called 'job security'. It involves being the only person who understands how to run 40-year-old software.

Unfortunately (fortunately?) I don't think that in 37 years, I'll be seeing a lot of systems that were installed in the 00's - the mentality these days is more about interconnection and interoperability than it was in the 70's.

That said, I'm a systems administrator, not a programmer. There'll still be servers in 30 years, they'll just probably glow blue and float around the data centre unbounded by gravity, or something equally crazy.


If you're the only person understanding a system, it's a great risk for the company. They will eventually replace the old system and then you're worthless to them.


If you are one of the few people that understands the old system, you can easily be one of the people that set's up the new system, at which point your one of the few people that knows the new system. The secret is to get on board to projects trying to replace your system, and not become so over paid that they really want to replace you.


Work for the government or government contractor. Closest thing to a guaranteed job you'll find. Ability to get a clearance will make that 100% security.


> Work for the government or government contractor. Closest thing to a guaranteed job you'll find.

I think that's a thing of the past, as plenty of people have found out in the last two years.


Not for the federal government or DoD.




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