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> the thing we have to do is not borrow money we can't repay.

Literally nobody takes student loans that they are capable of repaying. Why would you, unless you could get a 0% APR?

It'd be nice if young people - possessors of great foresight and fonts of wisdom, all - could predict whether they will be able to repay the very substantial loans they're likely to rack up in college. We are not living in a world, or an economy, where making such a prediction is easy or straightforward.




Literally nobody? My younger brother went to a state college during a time where he qualified for a ~3.4% loan from the government. I told him to take his time paying (for now), because a no-load passive index fund will yield higher than that. The past 3 years have been tremendous in terms of returns. He essentially used his student loans to net 12-18%. When family members caught wind of this, they told him it's not the best move, and our father paid off his loans.

So. No. Not literally nobody.


Using student loans as a form of leverage to invest in the stock market isn't new, so yeah, not "literally nobody." Point taken I guess.

It's just such a shockingly bad idea. We went from the topic of the average kid's inability to gauge the future value of their degree to the topic of the average kid's ability to predict the stock market well enough that using leverage to invest makes sense.


> Literally nobody takes student loans that they are capable of repaying.

Probably one of the most incorrect sweeping generalizations I have ever seen.

I finished my BS in CS about 3 1/2 years ago with about $44,000 in student loan debt. I'm currently on track to pay them off within the next 3 years. It'd probably be only 1 or 2 years if I didn't buy a car.


> Probably one of the most incorrect sweeping generalizations I have ever seen.

Not really, you simply didn't read my comment and the comment I responded to very thoughtfully.

The point of my reply is twofold. First, the obvious: you wouldn't take that loan unless you needed the money for your education (or wanted to gamble on the stock market, apparently, as one poster mentioned, but let's put that aside). If you can pay for your education without it, with saved money or through scholarships or grants, you'll do it. If you can't pay for your education, you take the loan. In that sense it wasn't a deep point, it was basically a tautology to point out how vapid the grandparent's comment was: "the thing we have to do is not borrow money we can't repay," "borrowing money you can't repay is a broken local protocol." As if arranging student loan financing were in some way similar to extending credit to a successful business that needs a little extra cash on hand until the end of the month. Ridiculous.

Second, and on to the more important point that I made in the second paragraph: if we assume the grandparent really means "will not be able to repay after several years of college" the problem with this whole line of thinking becomes obvious. The average student embarking on college has no idea whether they'll graduate successfully. They have no idea whether they'll be able to find a job in their field and they certainly have no idea how much they will be paid. In short, they have no idea whether they'll be able to repay that loan. In terms of policy, saying they should not take a student loan which they will be unable to repay is not an answer to anything since at best they're making an educated guess. In a situation like that, where people are guessing, the expected outcome is that a lot of people will guess incorrectly.




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