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Just from an year ago the cpu market has changed completely. The sheer amount of choice at all levels is staggering. For the mid level user the 1600 especially is a formidable offering, and the 1700 with 8 cores just ups the ante.

As a old Barton user it's really exciting to see AMD climb its way out of nearly a decade of darkness. A well deserved kudos to Lisa and the team.

When we talk about female CEOs she is rarely mentioned but here she is in probably one of the most technology intensive industries with a company that was clearly floundering and she has led AMD confidently out of the woods into a position of strength. What a performance.




> When we talk about female CEOs she is rarely mentioned but here she is in probably one of the most technology intensive industries with a company that was clearly floundering and she has led AMD confidently out of the woods into a position of strength. What a performance.

This. It seems amazing to have a technical CEO (she has a PhD from MIT) who also has management and turnaround ability.


She might have a technical degree, but they didn't take she from layout out a circuit board (or whatever) and make her CEO. She has been working her way up the management chain for at least 15 years. She has been successful in all that effort, and so she was rewarded with more responsibility, a task she has rising to.

When you look at successful CEOs in general, they are mostly promoted from within, after working their way up the ranks. That she has only been at AMD for a couple years total and seems to be doing well is more surprising than that she has a technical degree: technical degrees imply enough intelligence to figure out how to do management tasks if you want to take that route.


AnandTech's interview with Lisa Su on Ryzen Launch:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/11177/making-amd-tick-a-very-z...


>The sheer amount of choice at all levels is staggering.

Only when it comes to CPUs are two brands a "staggering" amount of choice. Something is wrong with this business, and I think it's the ISA patents. If Oracle can't patent their software API, then Intel/AMD shouldn't be able to patent their ISA either. An ISA is just a hardware API.


It's not just ISA.

If a competitor to AMD or Intel came out with a chip that requires recompiles, but is significantly ahead of them in a key metric, it would sell in the server market.

But competing with Intel and AMD takes billions of research, and well, the design of modern CPUs is surely a patent minefield too.

Just look at what's (not) happening with ARM servers.




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