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Show HN: 3D Renderer Built using 2D HTML Canvas (vivekseth.com)
54 points by vivekseth 11 months ago | hide | past | web | favorite | 28 comments



Neat, although the fun begins when you try to fill them since you cannot just ignore the primitives anymore if a vertex touches the near plane but instead you have to clip the primitive :-). Also without a z-buffer hidden surface removal becomes tricky if you want to avoid bad overlaps.

For fun i made a 3D thing a few years ago, you can check it here:

http://runtimeterror.com/pages/badsector/nyan/test.html

The code does the clipping part (triRender function) although HSR is painter's algorithm with a simple sorting (triSort) with a heuristic (triCompare) that i came out through trial and error (because of the distortion introduced by the perspective projection this doesn't always work and IIRC i'd need to actually split the polygons for better result but i was too lazy for that :-P).

Note that i wrote this for fun a few years ago, i am not a web dev nor really follow web tech. This is the biggest block of JavaScript code i've written for years :-P.


For something you wrote for fun, this particular engine is pretty impressive. It was reminiscent of the old PC virtual reality software engine, REND386 (by Bernie Roehl and Dave Stampe):

http://buter.software/rend386/

I played around a lot with that engine "back in the day". Modded a Power Glove to hook up to the parallel port (I also did the same for the Amiga), and I used a slightly modified VictorMaxx Stuntmaster for an HMD when it became available.

I had fun playing the little game you made in this engine. I think its very impressive (heck, you should throw it up on github). There used to be a thing in the late 1990s and early 2000s of something called the "3D Engine List" that listed all the 3D engines in various languages and whatnot (both open source and commercial). Eventually, that all went away for one reason or another. I kinda wish it still existed. When someone shares such work, it always brings a smile to my face. So thank you for sharing your work with us!


I actually had 3D Construction Kit and Freescape engine in mind when i made this. I've heard of REND386 before, but i had forgotten about it until you mentioned it. I never managed to use it though. I downloaded the code from the site, but it seems to require a version of Borland C++ i do not have. I might try to "port" it to BC5 at some point.

EDIT: i forgot. The 3D Engines List (i suspect you mean [1]) lives in DevMaster's DevDb [2]. DevDb was originally just engines and IIRC its initial data was from another database site "3dengines.net" from around 2004, which itself sourced the 3D Engines List.

[1] http://web.archive.org/web/20060107015234if_/http://cg.cs.tu...

[2] http://devmaster.net/devdb


Those two things are what got me with mine I made back in 2009. I had filled and shaded polygons, models with animations, and good framerate for the time, but then I ran into issues with z sorting and frustum culling in larger scenes. Still, was a great learning experience and I'm actually using some of the knowledge again for a retro game I'm working on.


I liked the game - even if simple. Reminds me of Hunter: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunter_(video_game)


This is amazing, thanks for sharing!


I'll also plug my own canvas rendering 3d library: http://seenjs.io/


This is seriously cool! Do you know if anybody has used your library (especially SVG masking) in production?

You should pump that website up a bit and make sure to name drop people who use it, though I appreciate your humility in that way.

Anyway, awesome work


Even though i tanked the CPU, i really liked the SVG masking demo, initially i thought it was just playing some video :-P.


Really cool that it also renders to SVG!


i love what you made; this is seriously awesome.


I wish there was some details around this! Recently I've been getting into writing a software 3D renderer thanks to this fantastic set of tutorials: https://github.com/ssloy/tinyrenderer/wiki.

Here's my creepy 3D rendering: http://mrspeaker.net/dev/head2/ It's not using a real z-buffer (just canvas's path rendering for triangles, and sorted back-to-front) but it's still pretty cool!


A very good book for graphics programming, covering all kinds of algorithms is

"Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice" from Foley and van Dam.

The 1st edition used Pascal, the 2dn C and now the third one uses C++ and C# on their examples.


I did something similar to this https://github.com/bbales/Simple3DCanvas

Its a great exercise, and I found that rendering basic .obj files was a great place to start - the spec is quite easy to follow: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wavefront_.obj_file


three.js has a canvas renderer that doesn't require WebGL - https://threejs.org/examples/?q=canvas#canvas_materials


Worth mentioning that the page takes keyboard arrow input to move around.

Very smooth, thanks for sharing!


A friend of mine once wrote a 3D effect in a 2D canvas in only 130 bytes of JavaScript code: https://www.dwitter.net/d/914


I have to say, as simplistic as it is, I like this renderer. I am curious, though why an orthographic projection (?) is being used, instead of a perspective one? From the code, it looks like it could support a perspective projection; I'm not sure if there is code in there to do it, or if you'd have to add it in (it's been ages since I messed around with my own 3D software engine stuff - and that was mostly in QB and VB)...


I didn't look at the code, but canvas only supports 3x3 transforms and you need 4x4 to do perspective: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/CanvasRende...

So if those cubes are textured, you'd need to subdivide the texture and approximate each with affine transforms. Here's an example of this hack (which was only necessary years ago before webgl existed): https://acko.net/blog/projective-texturing-with-canvas/


For wireframe objects like the one in the OP (which actually does use a perspective projection it seems), that's not really a problem. Just have your own code that does all the matrix multiplication, and you get a point you can plug right into moveTo/lineTo


Maybe it looks like it’s orthographic, but it’s actually a perspective projection. You should be able to tell if you use the arrow keys to move around.

Check out drawLine3D() in until.js to see where I apply the perspective projection.


Shameless plug for my own attempt at writing a software renderer in swift... https://github.com/kosua20/PtahRenderer

The readme lists a few useful resources; in my opinion the most difficult part was implementing clipping.


I have been working on this thing on and off for six+ years, I know almost nothing about graphics so this has just been a fun little exploration for my and probably nothing to base anything on:

https://github.com/donatj/3D-Package-JS


One of the other commenters mentioned this: https://github.com/ssloy/tinyrenderer/wiki

If you’re interested in learning graphics, this is a great place to start!


maybe i'm a little crazy (doesn't get much more generic than 3d cubes...) but the demo visualization brought me back to 3d animation in Flash. interesting peek/reminder of how our tooling contributes to our outputs. (or maybe i'm just crazy).

awesome work!


Here's my software renderer... https://github.com/fogleman/fauxgl :)


Can somebody please comment on why using a 2d canvas is a better solution than webgl? Or is it?

I was under the impression that to get the best GPU performance, webgl is the answer.


From a performance standpoint it’s definitely not better. I just built this for fun.




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