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I've streamed myself programming on Twitch, and can echo some additional knowledge in addition to what's shared in the article:

Don't expect anyone from Twitch to randomly discover your stream and have any idea what you're doing. Programming anything that isn't a video game on Twitch will be totally unfamiliar to their primary demographics. That said, use Twitter or something else to BRING YOUR OWN AUDIENCE. Be prepared to stream for a few hours or else you will likely never build up traction in your chat.

As this post says, vocalizing your stream of consciousness is vital; think of it like pair programming with the chat. I try to engage the chat without getting totally nerd sniped and ending up off topic.

I think the best way to really kick the tires on Twitch programming content would be to stream podcasts and/or have a joint channel of shared programming content and have many different programmers participating either via a shared account or Twitch Teams[0].

[0]: https://twitchtips.com/twitch-teams/




Vocalizing your stream of consciousness is very handy any time you are programming in front of others. I have found it to be especially useful during interviews, or while working with mentors/mentees.


> a joint channel of shared programming content and have many different programmers participating

I like that idea a lot -- have been wanting to team up with other devs on live twitch projects. If anyone is interested in getting this set up be sure to PM me -- I have 14 years of dev experience in a plethora of languages:

- Python - C# - Ruby - PHP - Javascript (front and backend) - HTML / CSS


I would be interested in joining! I'm working on (among some other things) a compiler right now that could be fun to live stream.




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