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Ruined in the very first line by suggesting that JIRA is somehow a project management tool.

JIRA manages issues.

Advanced use of JIRA may mean that you can use it as a risk log, or a milestone tracker, or an epic planner... but let's not mistake "advanced use of JIRA" with "advanced project management".

Just try and use JIRA to determine a critical path, or to track the impact on one project when a deliverable expected from another project slips, or to alert when the threshold of a slipped due date is exceeded. JIRA cannot even auto-promote a risk (something that may happen) to an issue (something that has happened) based on a change in circumstances (i.e. time-based overdue, or some threshold being exceeded).

Just try and use JIRA to go beyond a single project, and to manage a program of projects delivering multiple things as part of one complex product. If that sounds like jargon, imagine trying to use JIRA to project manage the the construction of a new vehicle, with multiple teams in different facilities providing the chassis, drivetrain, etc.

This is all basic stuff for good project management software, and only those not versed in project management make the mistake of thinking that JIRA is an issue.

On a project management tooling scale, JIRA itself would never pass the first level of maturity.

Few tech companies manage projects well. Few identify risks, few track inter project dependencies, few can determine whether there are resource issues (headcount availability) 6 months out due to multiple projects needing delivering at the same time and competing for the same internal resource.

JIRA is not a project management tool. It is a glorified issue tracker that allows the unskilled to imagine they are managing projects.

I guess that's a strong statement, but it does need to be made. JIRA can work for you, but it is only a simple tool.




"Few tech companies manage projects well." - That's because your comparing it to traditional style project management. It rarely works well in software.

If this style of project management worked, then companies that used it would be at the top. But they aren't.

The only companies that seem to use it are government projects, or corporations where software isn't their main concern. In my experience software output by these organisation is basically awful.

They don't get software development is more of discovery and learning process, where you become increasing better at serving your customers as you learn more. It's not a gather requirements, implement then finished thing.


This is good book on learning in software dev, https://www.amazon.com/Adaptive-Software-Development-Collabo...


Not sure why you're getting downvoted. That is a good book. I wouldn't necessarily follow everything in it, but every software manager could learn something from it.


> Ruined in the very first line by suggesting that JIRA is somehow a project management tool.

This level of pedantry is unwarranted, especially given that JIMRA was only mentioned in the comments. An issue tracker is a project management tool.

> imagine trying to use JIRA to project manage the the construction of a new vehicle,

Which is precisely why people don't use JIRA to manage construction. I don't see how this adds any value to whether JIRA helps manage software development projects.

> Just try and use JIRA to determine a critical path, or to track the impact on one project when a deliverable expected from another project slips, or to alert when the threshold of a slipped due date is exceeded.

I thought the idea of Agile is that you focus on the mechanics of delivery and not the expectations of delivery? This comment sounds so "enterprise IT" that I don't even know where to start with dissecting it.

You seem to have a gripe with JIRA specifically and I can't pinpoint why one would get so worked up about it.


> An issue tracker is a project management tool.

Issue tracking is a very small subset of project management. It's true that an issue tracker is a “project management tool” in the sense that it is a tool for some aspect of a project. It's not a “project management tool” in the more comprehensive sense that that term is often, but not always used.


Plus the fact JIRA has extensions such as JIRA Agile, and Portfolio which is really means its becoming a project management tool.

Just not prince2/waterfall/pmo style project management, which I avoid at all costs.


What tools do you recommend for project and requirements management, preferably ones that have an on-premise option to protect sensitive data like risk and talent dependencies? Some options:

TaskJuggler, http://taskjuggler.org

Microsoft Project (non-cloud version)

MicroFocus (formerly Borland) Caliber, https://www.microfocus.com/products/requirements-management/...


JIRA is an issue tracker

JIRA Agile is Agile Project Management

Then there is JIRA Portfolio for multiple projects.

Software development projects often use vastly different tools for project management then bridge building.

I find critical paths at a project level fairy useless when using agile style methods. Since user story priorities can change fairy quickly based on feedback.

But can be useful at the portfolio level.


Yes the specific comment about Jira seems odd. It works, but there's nothing particularly great about it. When we did a competitive evaluation CA Agile Central (Rally) scored much higher and I find it works pretty well, at least for large complex programs.


I disagree that this is "ruined"




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