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There was no parking garage for the new bars and restaurants, so all visitors simply parked in the residents' neighborhoods

This is a solved problem: Charge for parking and the shortage goes away. Meter technology is decades old and well understood. https://www.amazon.com/High-Cost-Free-Parking-Updated/dp/193...




When you become dictator, maybe that will be viable.

In the meantime, what sane city council member is going to tell residents they need to pay for parking in front of their own townhouses?


Give residents special permits which allow the to park for free. That's how it works here (Helsinki, Finland). Permit is not free, but cheap. It is for specific vehicle and the registered owner needs to live there. There permits are not per street, but the city is divided to several areas.


Resident parking, €20pm in Lyon, France, knowing that the public transport is excellent. I wish they would ban cars entirely in the 500,000ppl area, but you need a car from time to time, when you're pregnant, old, have a sprained ankle or back, need to carry an iMac around or to just get out for a hike in the countryside. Still, one-day pollution permits would be better than taxing only parking.


Everyone would jump on board if the city would just allocate the parking revenues to the home or building owners.


Where has this successfully been implemented?

There's a similar mechanism to what you proposed, resident-only parking permits. This pits the business owners against the residents. It also means that a resident can't have their friends come to visit without risking a ticket.

The knee-jerk HN-ism of quick fixes doesn't work here.

The only actual solution is the long-term dual-pronged approach: parking structures in the interim, while improving public transit coverage overall.


Japan, for one: http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2016/08/the....

Washington State also makes some zoning decisions and targets some growth targets at the state level (see http://digitalcommons.law.seattleu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?a..., although I can't find a better piece off the top of my head), which helps matters.

The only actual solution is the long-term dual-pronged approach: parking structures in the interim, while improving public transit coverage overall.

The actual solution is people paying for what they use, i.e. markets: If people want parking structures, they'll pay for them. I'd really suggest that you look at the link in the comment I posted above.


Please don't link-bomb me in order to "win". Explain, with citations.

Your Japan link is not applicable to this conversation (though I love that article, it comes up whenever NIMBY stuff is discussed on HN). I consider that arguing in bad faith.

Zoning isn't going to magically help residents get parking, nor is it going to provide a place for paying customers to put their cars while eating and drinking.

> They'll pay for them

Who? The customers would all love to pay for parking, but there wasn't a structure. You're arguing against some point you think I'm making but I'm not.


Many many cities in Europe.

People who live there can park for free, anyone else has to pay a meter.

This solves the issues.


1000 people need parking. There are 500 spaces. Paid parking doesn't solve the problem in this instance. The overall effect of paid parking isn't at issue.


Yes it does. Make it so expensive that overall only 500 people (including those who live there) can afford to park there.

Problem solved.

And that’s how my city got $1/min parking spots.


Which also cuts in half the number of customers for the businesses.

In urban planning, one has to be careful to solve the correct problem. The problem is not too many cars parked on a residential street. The problem is getting customers to businesses with minimal bad side effects.

Any "parking solution" that kills the businesses to fix the parking is not actually a solution.


> In urban planning, one has to be careful to solve the correct problem. The problem is not too many cars parked on a residential street. The problem is getting customers to businesses with minimal bad side effects.

The problem is getting people to different places, without them using too much space within the city. This means as little car usage as possible.

The example I mentioned – combined with cheap public transit – is very effective.


Cheap public transit is an actual solution.

Parking meters are just one way to get people to use it, and not a very good one: by the time people find out there are meters (when trying to park), it's too late to take the transit!

The money it cost to install meters would have been better spent on a marketing campaign to raise awareness of the transit option, or subsidizing the transit prices.


It's the problem here in LA. Designed for cars, lots of permit parking in some areas (usually more well-off ones with pull) and metered places. We're trying to catch up public transit with demand but unfortunately it still makes sense to have a car to get everywhere you need to go. Buses are stuck in the same traffic (no designated lanes) as you are, cycling can be done but is extremely dangerous, and the metro's current hub-and-spoke is useful if you're going downtown but the amount of stations is less than ideal (some stops more than a mile or so apart).


Modern parking meter systems are very cheap — especially because you just put up one ticket automat every 200m where you can pay with cash, phone, debit card, etc and get a little printed slip of paper saying date and time until when you can park, and then put that in your car.

Veeery cheap compared to actual meters.

And no, no marketing campaign or subsidy can be as effective as the parking costs. As long as parking isn't at least twice or thrice as expensive as transit no one will use transit. Its a serious issue IRL here. For a while they even did free transit, ads on every single billboard, bus and train, and still people rather parked for 10$ a 30min in the cuty, or even parked illegally.


Alternative as used in for example Rotterdam is to have a similar machine where you input your license plate. Then you don't need the ticket.

And this enables apps where you basically press [start parking] and [stop parking] and you won't even need to walk.


It won't kill businesses, it will move them. No business has the right to a specific location if it requires it's neighbors properties to.


First of all, public street parking, even in front of houses, is not "property."

Second, if urban planning is done properly, residential streets don't experience parking problems. That's the whole point of this thread.

And if urban planning is not done well, then it doesn't matter where businesses move--they'll still run into problems.

Oh, and if they all leave, then the neighbors will have a nice blighted block with empty buildings next door. Problem solved?

Parking meters do not magically create more parking spots. They create an incentive to use an alternative, but first there needs to be a good alternative.


> if urban planning is done properly, residential streets don't experience parking problems. That's the whole point of this thread.

If urban planning is done properly, there are no residential streets. Every street mixes residential, offices, and commercial properties.


Now you made it full circle to my original comment, "you can do this if you're a dictator. Otherwise, residents won't agree to pay for parking in front of their own homes."


No, I have not. The residents still get free parking, of course. If there’s more residents than parking spots, well, that sucks.


Resident only parking permits is nothing like private parking meters.


It's common in Europe. Residents get a special (yearly) discount. Road and sidewalk are not property of the house owner.




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