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you got a link anywhere?





I missed that one, and it's the best I heard so far. Bit of noise in the background, but the voice itself is very believable. I can imagine in year or two the radio and TV will start using this tech instead of actual speakers. Also, translation and synchronization of any content will be so much cheaper.


Try listening to the NOAA weather radio. They've been using very good TTS for years.


Wow, they are. Very surprised.

This is so good I'm wondering whether this is actually a massive (massive) sound bank. I think it might be a sound bank.

A random radio receiver site I found that doesn't require Flash, tuned to NOAA for Akron OH: http://tunein.com/radio/NOAA-Weather-Radio-1624-s88289/

The list I got the above link from (^F "noaa"): http://tunein.com/radio/Weather-c100001531/

I suspect the warbling I'm hearing is not due to TTS imperfections but 64kbps artifacting.


The one I listen to will occasionally mispronounce something in a way that a human never would, or say the name of a punctuation mark.


Huh. I see. Do you happen to know what station you use? I'd kind of like to hear this for myself (for the sole reason that I'd like to get an idea of what it sounds like, since that does definitely sound like a TTS).


KZZ40,162.45 MHz, Deerfield NH. Note that the stations have several different voices they use for different reports. Now that I think about it, I'm not sure which one I heard the mistakes on - it might have been one of the older ones.

BTW, I like the Tom voice more than the newer Paul. Paul is more realistic, but is also more soft-spoken and monotonic. Tom has more inflection and sounds more...forceful. I know it's just my imagination, but sometimes Tom sounds annoyed at bad weather :)


> KZZ40,162.45 MHz, Deerfield NH.

I see. I can't seem to find an online receiver for that frequency, although I did find that WZ2500 uses or seems to have used that frequency (for Wytheville VA).

I had a look at SDR.hu (a site I may or may not have just dug out of Google for the first time), but unfortunately the RTL-SDR receivers I can find seem to focus entirely on 0-30MHz. There are a couple ~400MHz receivers but nothing for ~160MHz.

(I may have fired up the receiver I found in NH and fiddled with it, puzzled, for 10 minutes before realizing the scale is in kHz, not MHz... yay)

> Note that the stations have several different voices they use for different reports.

Right.

> Now that I think about it, I'm not sure which one I heard the mistakes on - it might have been one of the older ones.

That's entirely possible. (But hopefully not. I kind of want to hear. :P)

> BTW, I like the Tom voice more than the newer Paul. Paul is more realistic, but is also more soft-spoken and monotonic. Tom has more inflection and sounds more...forceful. I know it's just my imagination, but sometimes Tom sounds annoyed at bad weather :)

I just learned about this service, I have to admit (I'm in Australia). It sounds really nice to be able to have a computer continuously read out the weather conditions to you as they change. And I can completely relate to the idea of preferring the voice that sounds unimpressed when the weather's bad :D


It really is a useful service. Many people have battery powered radios that include AM, FM and weather radio.

I'm not surprised that they re-use the frequencies. These are local weather stations, only intended to serve a radius of a hundred miles or so (at least here on the east coast). In addition to my local station I can receive the one in Boston, about 50 miles south of me.


Do we know what they're using? I found a few references to AT&T Natural Voices.


According to Wikipedia, "In 2002, the National Weather Service contracted with Siemens Information and Communication and SpeechWorks to introduce improved, more natural voices. The Voice Improvement Plan (VIP) was implemented, involving a separate computer processor linked into CRS that fed digitized sound files to the broadcast suite.... Additional upgrades in 2003 produced an improved male voice nicknamed "Tom", which could change intonation based on the urgency of a product"

Also, here are some audio clips http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/info/newvoice.html




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