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This reads like a Faustian bargain. I've seen this sort of stuff happen over and over to my colleagues, it was worst in the late '90s and early '00s. As much as I wanted to work for a startup once in my life, I learned that the only way to do "startup" is if you are the founder. Practically everyone else is along for the ride.

The US used to have a steady IPO market but that has dried up in recent years. I have read that 2017 might brighten things a bit, but we'll see.




"The US used to have a steady IPO market but that has dried up in recent years. I have read that 2017 might brighten things a bit, but we'll see."

The biggest problem is SOX: going from a private company to public (something I've done twice, now) is a pain, and can take a year to implement all the regulations (you may even need to change source code, and also commit processes). It's even worse on the accounting/business side. More importantly perhaps, it's expensive: you don't want to take your company public unless you can afford the hit to productivity and cash flow.

According to the WSJ, that's why there aren't more IPOs these days.


Yep, it's way easier and way less friction to store everything including payment information in one huge database accessible to all employees.

A security nightmare, but time and time again we've seen you don't need good security to make a lot of money.




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