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For me personally, if I was in that position I would stick it out for however long it takes. I cannot imagine having enough liquid assets to be happy to risk $100k like that. I am also of the opinion that even if I did amass such value in equity that there's a high chance I'm going to get screwed on whatever the book value of it today is tomorrow when I actually cash out. If it's so bad that I need to run not walk out of the building then I'd have to just make peace with binning it off.

For most of us where startup equity comes with a real valuation of zero (i.e. anything but the Uber or AirBnBs of this world) - I think you're a lot better off ignoring it entirely.

> to walk away from this situation with nothing

This is where I think you are healthier having at least a market rate salary. Then you've not walked away with nothing - you've been a regular employee and happy with your lot and ready to move on.




>> I cannot imagine having enough liquid assets to be happy to risk $100k like that

$100k isn't much money. If you've taken stock in lieu of $15-$20k/yr salary, $100k is pretty easy to make up (especially considering that many bigger, established companies also pay bonuses and have a better structure for vacation and such).

>> anything but the Uber or AirBnBs of this world Personally those are ones I'd be really, really scared of having stock in. They've boxed themselves into a corner: they have precisely one positive exit scenario: IPO. At their current valuations (2x and more of their competition), there's no reasonable path to acquisition. And if they continue to take investor money, those late investors are taking care to protect themselves (whether it's multipliers, last-in/first-out, etc). Employees are absolutely last in line to get the scraps unless things go crazy.

After IPO, there's the lockup period, during which there are earnings results (I believe 2?). If those don't go really well, a downturn in stock price can wipe out employee shares pretty quickly. If I'm an employee of either of those two companies, I'm a little nervous.


> $100k isn't much money. If you've taken stock in lieu of $15-$20k/yr salary, $100k is pretty easy to make up (especially considering that many bigger, established companies also pay bonuses and have a better structure for vacation and such).

I'm not sure I follow. If I agree to be underpaid by $20k a year say then I'm not sure how I'd then on reduced salary save up $100k after tax and to the extent I wouldn't "miss it" in exercising the options. If a company is paying bonuses etc I'd rather get the market rate salary to begin with and ignore the stock. I may be heavily misunderstanding your first sentence though :)

The lockup period post IPO is an excellent point - and probably further fuels my cynicism around low percentage stock options as anything but a gamble.


Nope, I think I mis-understood what you were saying :) I thought you had said "risk $100k" meaning $100k worth of on-paper gains, not $100k of cash to gamble on stock. My mistake!


You divide 100k by 3 to account for the risk, and by 4 again to account for the vesting schedule (usually 4 years).

The shares are worth at most 8k in salary, that is if they're somewhat liquid. (which they are definitely not for startup and far away IPO).

If you took a $20k drop in salary for that, you've been not only screwing yourself at this job but also for ALL your future jobs, because future companies will try to downplay you based on your current salary.


If a company asks for your current salary, say "I'm sorry but I'm restricted as to who I can share that information with".

If they ask who made that restriction, link to this post.




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