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Interesting, I hadn't heard of N3. What clients support this? Punching N3.parse() into Chrome's console doesn't work.



Turtle is a lot more popular than N3:

https://www.w3.org/TeamSubmission/turtle/

Turtle is a subset of N3. N3 has some syntactic sugar plus also some syntax to describe first-order logic statements that include implication and the use of existential and universal qualifiers.

Tim-Berners Lee started work on this software:

http://infomesh.net/2001/cwm/

which implements reasoning on N3, but it is not particularly performant for a number of reasons -- one is that it does not implement any description logic optimizations, another is that it is written in Python, another is that it doesn't have a particularly sophisticated rules engine.

The closest thing to a standard in this area is ISO Common Logic

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Logic

which is based on KIF but uses RDF for the basic data structures, i.e. you can load RDF data and work on it with Common Logic.

There are plenty of people who use logical reasoning over RDF data but usually they use something specific to their tools, such as the Jena Rules Engine, or some kind of Prolog -- it also is not that hard to stuff RDF data into a SAT solver, theorem prover or similar tools.

It's a conspicuous absense that there is no common standard for production rules.


Fortunately, the N3.parse() I mentionned accepts any dialect of RDF (N3, turtle, ...)

Oh, and btw, the package is here: https://www.npmjs.com/package/n3




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