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I think the highlights don't mention the release's best bits. The full release notes are way larger and it really depends on what you do, what you might consider the most interesting part.

Also I am happy to see a bunch of "Sponsored by..." Netflix, Yandex, NGINX Inc, Netgate, Citrix, Juniper Networks, Microsoft, Dell, Multiplay, ScaleEngine, etc. in there.

https://www.freebsd.org/releases/11.0R/relnotes.html




As a full time developer, you are correct that the relnotes don't capture all the great stuff. It is difficult to keep track of all that is going on. The only way I know how is to continuously read the commit logs. But distilling that down into a useful document for end users is quite hard, especially retroactively.

I will say that the release has non-trivial improvements in TCP performance (Mike Karels, Matt Macy, Netflix crew).

VNET jails also should be safe to tear down, and SysV SHM can be jailed/virtualized which should be interesting to many users.


>I will say that the release has non-trivial improvements in TCP performance

For your average home / small business user? Or do you need to be at Netflix scale to see the benefits? (that's not a bad thing).


It matters most for people doing 10-100gbps throughput, CPU usage will be lower and more stable in all cases though.

There has been a lot of improvement to many network card drivers in 11, and I am helping to push/fund the final integration of Matt Macy's "iflib" for the common intel em/igb/ixgbe drivers.

There are a lot of goodput improvements coming soon, which will affect all TCP users. I had Matt Macy upgrade TCP CUBIC to match 2016 RFC and most Linux behaviors (HyStart). Hiren Panchasara has been working full time for almost 2 years to address many other goodput and correctness issues in the TCP stack. Some of these are in 11, but the majority will hit in 11.1.

Another company is working on the recently announced BBR congestion control from Google and a TCP stack with RACK/PRR https://wiki.freebsd.org/DevSummit/201606/Transport. The end result of all this will be a more tightly integrated and coherent TCP implementation, which should make FreeBSD have the best network stack again in 2017 after falling behind for a while.


We did a lot of work on IPsec as well.


Heh, I'll have to try moving back to CUBIC then. I've had lots of problems with throughput to sites with latency >= 300ms, since FreeBSD 9.


Also on the networking front, FreeBSD now has modern AQMs like CoDel and FQ-CoDel. This means it can now compete against Linux for use in a (wired-only) home router.


>SysV SHM can be jailed/virtualized which should be interesting to many users.

You mean I can run multiple postgresql jails on a machine? YASSS


IIRC you've been able to do that already, but you need to ensure that the postgres users have different UIDs.


The SysV IPC functionality wasn't sufficiently isolated in jails before; you could enable it, but it would defeat the purpose of a jail as a security and isolation mechanism.


> VNET jails also should be safe to tear down

Unfortunately, VNET is still off by default, no?


The important word is should. VNET is still an experimental feature.


I think the highlights don't mention the release's best bits.

It's always challenging to put together those highlights... different people consider different things important, and the release engineer has to guess what the largest number of people will care about. (And sometimes things don't end up in the release notes at all because developers forget to flag their commits with "Relnotes: yes", but we're getting better at that.)


Reading the release notes indicates they are still working on their EFI/uEFI support. I've also noticed a lot of other free OSes that seem to be struggling with it.

Is EFI really that complicated? I also ask because it doesn't seem to me that EFI hasn't really made the PC better for anyone other than Microsoft and Apple.


UEFI boot just works, for the most part.

11.0 doesn't have support for EFI runtime services, but a lot of that has been added to CURRENT (which will become 12.0 and maybe make it into 11.1 via backport) very recently.




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