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I'm not an engineer but I'm am a tech consultant. First, there are options outside of engineering that you may like. Second, being rejected by 20 companies doesn't seem excessive to me. It really is a numbers game. I have 10 years of experience and I'm looking a list of 83 places that didn't want me within the last year. Interviewing really beats me up and makes me feel like I have absolutely nothing to offer.

Companies focus on these code puzzles and things even when you will literally never come close to that level of code in practice. I mean, I can't even complete the screening challenges Uber gives you but I still found something I can do in the industry. If you are applying for some senior engineer position than you probably need to know this stuff, but if you are looking for a junior role than I really doubt the value of these.

Honestly, I question if I'm cut out for the work I do still. I sometimes just want to walk away from tech and never come back. Today is one of those days that I am questioning WTF I am doing with my life.




> First, there are options outside of engineering that you may like. Second, being rejected by 20 companies doesn't seem excessive to me. It really is a numbers game. I have 10 years of experience and I'm looking a list of 83 places that didn't want me within the last year.

This is kind of a tangent, but I don't understand how the sentiments "it's just a numbers game" and "nobody can find good engineers" can coexist. It seems like the people expressing the latter are trying to simultaneously be beggars and choosers.


I think "nobody can find good engineers" is a fallacy. Either the filtering is failing or they simply aren't paying enough to attract "good engineers". If they are paying an average wage they should expect average engineers to apply.




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