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What makes this better than actual coordinates?

I can easily find numeric coordinates on a map, without any special tables or computations.

I can immediately see if two numeric coordinates are close just by looking at the numbers.

Very many people understand how to use standard numeric coordinates.




>What makes this better than actual coordinates? I can easily find numeric coordinates on a map, ...

It may be "better" and more optimized for a particular purpose: human memorization

It has a similar mnemonic strategy to other memorization techniques for numbers.[1] Apparently, there's something special about the language processing of the brain that makes it easier to remember words than numeric sequences. Phone-number-to-words (vanity phone #) is another example.[2][3]

For other tasks you mentioned such as mathematical calculation/comparison, or computer lookup in db indexes, the encoding is definitely not optimized for that. However, that's not its purpose.

[1]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mnemonic_major_system

[2]http://lifehacker.com/201752/spell-your-phone-number

[3]http://hello-operator.softwareadvice.com/want-memorable-toll...


Same reason we have DNS instead of remembering IP addresses.


DNS allows us to keep swapping the IP address associated with a service though, this (afaik) doesn't.


Ability to swap underlying ip address is orthogonal to using alphanumerics in DNS. Numeric sequences could also be used as CNAME for the ip address. But we don't because of human brain.


Seems more easily remembered and therefore easier to accurately share without reliance on technology. 6342 LAY TRANSCENDENT (my location right now) is easier to write down, and comes with a built in typo checker (icon is the earth in this case).


Probably not a good idea to post your address where people can see who you are (you have your keybase details on your profile)


I'd be happy to meet anyone from HackerNews who wanted to drop by. I'm here everyday. It's the Tucows office in Toronto and it's no secret I work here most weekdays.


Try remembering and telling someone your home's coordinates. Then try telling them the coordinates of the restaurant up the street.


This would seem to suffer from a similar problem, given that we travel on and interact with roads primarily.

Decoupling from that seems like it would be set to fail for human memory, since there would probably be nothing to reinforce the memory over time for your restaurant example.




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