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It's a simple reflection of the fact that the Go creators have never used a modern IDE.

Anyone using a modern IDE pretty much never even thinks about imports, which are (and should be) automatically managed by the tool, not by the programmer.




This statement is probably true but that's kind of irrelevant. IMO it is actually a virtue of the language if it is perfectly usable without a modern IDE. Contrast that with Java and you'll see what I mean. Go follows the Unix philosophy where things like imports or formatting can be supplied by any external tool. If you wish to bundle all these small tools into a single IDE you can do it, too.


Everything is perfectly usable without an IDE, you are just more productive with one than without one. Regardless of the language.

In this particular case, the IDE could automatically remove the imports when you remove the corresponding symbol from your source, or automatically add the import when you introduce a new symbol.

The "can be supplied by any external tool" is a cop out that was acceptable in the 20th century but this is 2016, we have a higher bar for developer productivity.


Nothing about the language or its tooling prevents you from building such an IDE or a plugin to one of the existing IDEs. And there is absolutely nothing in Java that makes IntelliJ so awesome. These things are totally orthogonal. What I like about Go's tooling is that it allows good plugins for various text editors (eg. Sublime or Atom) to be implemented with relatively little effort.


> Nothing about the language or its tooling prevents you from building such an IDE or a plugin to one of the existing IDEs. And there is absolutely nothing in Java that makes IntelliJ so awesome. These things are totally orthogonal.

No, they're not.

There are a few necessary conditions for this kind of symbiosis to work well:

- The language has to be statically typed. Without type information, the IDE is completely blind and can barely help you at all without human supervision.

- The IDE has to be written on top of the same runtime as the language it's editing. This is what makes Eclipse/IDEA and Visual Studio so spectacular: they understand the bytecode they are working with.

These are necessary conditions but they're not sufficient. You can still write crappy IDE's if these conditions are met, but thankfully, IDEA/Eclipse/Visual Studio are technical wonders that multiply the productivity of their users.

For example, in Go, the simple action of selecting the the surrounding expression simply doesn't exist anywhere. It's the most basic automatic action that's trivial to do with the proper language and IDE, and yet nonexistent in Go. Along with tens of others.

That's the price to pay when a language is designed without any consideration for its tooling nor basic things we learned about language design these past twenty years.


> The language has to be statically typed

Go is statically typed.

> the simple action of selecting the the surrounding expression simply doesn't exist anywhere

How so? It's trivial with the `go/ast` package.


Does any Go editor support that?


Is it relevant to the question at hand? Languages != their IDEs.


Assuming emacs doesn't qualify as a "modern" IDE. I have a hook that calls go imports to remove and add imports.




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