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I tend to take it for granted that third party services can and will delete everything you post whenever it suits them, or even just because whoever is running the data management is inept or uninterested in a sane backup policy. But that might just be because I "grew up", digitally speaking, in the era of self-hosted websites and blogs, of FTP and local development pushed remotely. It does seem that the entire system is now designed around always trusting some other service for managing our data, so I wonder if this will continually influence users to trust an illusion, and a far harder to understand mental model of what is "mine", "ours" and "yours". Maybe it'll all course correct itself, with services baking into their models personalized data recovery and management, or at least a more sane model of data ownership. But I do think it will take more issues like this, instead of just the "death by a thousand cuts" that is happening now when your spouse wipes out all of your playlists because they didn't know they affected every device, or not knowing which photos have been synced and which haven't because your cloud storage is full.

Sometimes all the magic starts feeling a lot less like Harry Potter and more like Pee Wee's Big Adventure.




> But that might just be because I "grew up", digitally speaking, in the era of self-hosted websites and blogs, of FTP and local development pushed remotely.

That's because you're technically proficient, hardly the case for most people. For example, the blog in question seemed to be art oriented. I think that today it's very easy for anyone to host and setup a blog for a couple of bucks a month but few things can beat the convenience of just signing up on blogspot.




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