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I wish I was smart enough to be that wrong.



How do you know you are not? Well, you certainly have a case by making this assumption in the first place.

Are you "not smart enough" in all areas, or just not not in (deep) math? Rhetorical question.

Look at "IQ". There is no such thing as "IQ" - simply because there are so man vastly different things that you should measure. I forgot the lecture, but you can show that the exact same "IQ" can be for people with vastly different skill sets, or different IQs with a completely different distribution of abilities, and the higher IQ losing out in one or more fields. The guy with the Einstein math and physics abilities can be a total dimwit when it comes to managing or just dealing with people, for example, something I would argue the world is in much greater need of compared to getting more math geniuses.

When you don't understand something ask yourself: Do I actually need to understand this?

I took about 70 edX and Coursera courses mostly in completely different fields then my own (CS). One of the most important lessons is that there is sooooooo much knowledge.

Have a look at this little story of a very simple product that humans make (ignore which concrete one they chose): https://medium.com/@kevin_ashton/what-coke-contains-221d4499...

Summary quote (product name replaced with "X"):

    > The number of individuals who know how to make X is zero.
    > The number of individual nations that could produce X is zero.
That's for one of the most simple products out there.

You do not need to understand each and every subject. You are not dumb if you don't. You may be dumb if you think you are dumb that you don't understand every single random subject... :)


>Look at "IQ". There is no such thing as "IQ" - simply because there are so man vastly different things that you should measure.

When you measure vastly different things, like reaction time and performance in IQ tests, there is surprisingly strong correlation (> 0.8 without correction for attenuation). This supports the hypothesis that there is such thing as G-factor.

None of those vastly different things we can measure measures it directly, but they all together point into the same direction. What has reaction time have to do with academic performance, job attainment, income, or IQ tests?

Most of those who argue for different intelligences don't provide good evidense against strong correlation.


That argument is like "economy" vs. "individual". When I wrote "there is no such thing as IQ" I mean (as stated?) that this is not a concrete thing, but a summary measure of many things. Of course it exists, it just doesn't represent a (single) concrete thing. The growth rate of the economy, maybe, comes to mind.

Of course averages work fine when you look at the grander things, but they are useless when looking at individuals. So sure, IQ "works" in that sense, for "big picture stats". It's not good for individuals. (Necessary additional comment: Looking at more than one individual is not "looking at an individual", but it again is "statistics".)

If you only want to place "the best" on average, going for "IQ" is enough. If you want to match each one (individually, not by global average - in which case after hiring by IQ you just place them anywhere) to the appropriate job it isn't. The distribution of skills under a given IQ score can be very different.

    > IQ is an imperfect predictor of many outcomes. A person who scores very low
    > on a competently administered IQ test is likely to struggle in many domains.
    > However, an IQ score will miss the mark in many individuals, in both directions.
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/what-do-...


> IQ is an imperfect predictor of many outcomes.

It's _very_ often the best single predictor.

As the article you quote puts it:

>IQ is an imperfect predictor of many outcomes. A person who scores very low on a competently administered IQ test is likely to struggle in many domains. However, an IQ score will miss the mark in many individuals, in both directions.

If IQ test misjudges 5-20% of applicants, it's still hell of a predictor.


    >  it's still hell of a predictor.
I think I had already responded to that. The question is "on what level" and "what for". See my previous response.

I wrote "If you only want to place "the best" on average, going for "IQ" is enough. If you want to match each one (individually, not by global average - in which case after hiring by IQ you just place them anywhere) to the appropriate job it isn't."

It's the same as arguing for racial profiling because "it works". Well it does! If you don't care about people (individuals) but only about peoples.




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