Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

> I guess I was unclear, my point was that I think some TLD should be dedicated for home networks, with ICANN and especially browsers recognizing that.

If it's for home networks, .home resolution would usually occur at the DNS server on your router. How does the browser know that your router follows the new rules and won't route that DNS request up to your ISP, and therefore should trust the request?

> But that's not an issue, because if it's not on your subnet then you wouldn't be visiting it in the first place.

Unless your attacker can get you to click a link? That's a pretty easy thing to get users (especially the unexperienced) to do. Or they can sneak it into a secure page and monitor requests/serve malicious assets.

> In the worst case, you could make the browser check your subnet mask. But since the contents on those IPs will be unique from local network to local network anyway, I really don't see the point in bothering.

This ignores the case where your local network is either (a) infiltrated (b) a coffeeshop. The second being super common, and would need to be guarded against by the browser having some sort of Windows-style public/private network distinction, which users would remember to configure correctly.

> But since the contents on those IPs will be unique from local network to local network anyway, I really don't see the point in bothering.

I'm not seeing the connection. If someone with control of your public internet connection (i.e. what HTTPS is designed to guard against) sends a response when your browser requests something from that address, what does it matter what that address does in another local network?

Everything I've described here has been an element of a real attack where something somewhere was more trusted than it was supposed to be. This would add a massive array of attack vectors, and at best would indicate to the user trust in something that has no reason to be trusted.

If you're doing something on your local network, it makes a lot more sense to just create a self-signed CA and put the root on your devices. In the onion case, you should use HTTPS between you and your proxy (e.g. with a *.onion wildcard cert) to make sure you actually connect to your proxy.




Applications are open for YC Winter 2020

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: