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Exactly. The Wide Gamut is simply a selling point to have "vivid" colors. But most of the images including UI are still sRGB. Showing them on a 24-bit wide-gamut display means every color component is mapped to only a subset of 0-255 values. That will lead to a more noticeable banding than viewing the same image on an sRGB display [1].

The aforementioned DCI-P3 even have a higher gamma value of 2.6. Currently, almost all design compositions are done in the gamma compressed space, and the incorrect AA [2] and blending will be even worse on those devices.

Another thing is that most of displays are not even calibrated properly. Not even speaking about technical characteristics of the screens.

[1] https://twitter.com/vmdanilov/status/745321798309412865 [2] https://twitter.com/vmdanilov/status/712327571116056576




The antialiasing linear vs. gamma debate is an interesting one - check out this conversation, wherein nobody could figure out a reasoned method other than "sometimes AA in sRGB looks good"... https://twitter.com/rygorous/status/512371399542202368


My reply on Twitter in full:

Text blending in linear space perceived as “too thin” and inconsistent because font weights are choosen for the sRGB [1].

With light fonts at small sizes, sRGB blending also has apparent weight changes with the background [2].

But with bold fonts, the weight is consistent only shapes are perfectly smooth with the linear blending [3].

And with more colors, the sRGB blending is a failure [4].

[1] http://i.imgur.com/qKDfCnj.png [2] http://i.imgur.com/Z6sOUNI.png [3] http://i.imgur.com/sTosihk.png [4] http://i.imgur.com/fLpe150.png


The Wide Gamut is simply a selling point to have "vivid" colors. But most of the images including UI are still sRGB. Showing them on a 24-bit wide-gamut display means every color component is mapped to only a subset of 0-255 values.

Unless they're just being mapped directly, which would probably make everything automatically look much more vivid... and that would help sell those displays too.


But some of these values have to be reserved for those extra colors in the wide gamut colorspace. And sRGB just fits in that range. That's why to truly take advantage of the wide gamut, the whole rendering process from a software through a GPU to an output device has to be at least 10 bits per channel (relying on what's being widely adopted). Otherwise, customers will be missing out with almost all available content.


Sure but it would also make everything look inaccurate.




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