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As someone who has only visited SV, I wonder: In order to avoid the crazy living expenses in SV and SF, why don't more people start companies within 100 miles of SV, in cheaper places like San Ramon/Castro Valley, Livermore, Sacramento, Pleasanton, Modesto, etc.? That way you have reasonable proximity without having to suffer the living quality issues associated with SV and SF.



> In order to avoid the crazy living expenses in SV and SF, why don't more people start companies within 100 miles of SV, in cheaper places like San Ramon/Castro Valley, Livermore, Sacramento, Pleasanton, Modesto, etc.? That way you have reasonable proximity without having to suffer the living quality issues associated with SV and SF.

No, instead, you have the much greater living quality issues associated with the places you mention, which is why SF/SV are more expensive places to live -- people are willing to pay a lot more to live in SF/SV than in, e.g., the Central Valley.


Because then you're dealing with the talent pool in Sacramento, and people in SF aren't going to commute 100 miles to get paid Sacramento salaries.


They might if you can offer half the cost of living and 75% of the salary. The company saves on rent as well.


That still involves moving to Sacramento. Most of the people in SV are there because they want to be in SV, not Sacramento. They want to be in SV to be in the center of what's happening, not to mention the cultural fusion of SF.


I'm talking more about people who have grow up and have families. That stuff gets boring after you get older.


"That stuff"?

Partying definitely loses it's luster (at least for me) but the opportunity for meetups, learning about new tech, etc. hopefully doesn't. Clearly it's a balancing act but everything in life is. How much time do you want to spend with a spouse, kid, hobby, exercise, work, meetups, relaxation, sleep, etc. People are here because they want to have access to all these options. I'm 41 and still excited about all that is available here. So maybe I don't want to grow up. :-)


In that case, you don't get to complain it's too expensive. I just dont think its good for kids to grow up in a tiny apartment.


I absolutely do get to complain. I also vote against the nimby council members who refuse to build residential in lock step with commercial in Mountain View which led to half the board being replaced a few years ago... Things still have not gotten much better and now they are collecting signatures to get rent control on the ballot which in general I am opposed to but clearly something needs to change.

Everyone has different ideas about how much space is necessary. Up until recently homes were really tiny and it varies greatly by country (ref: http://shrinkthatfootprint.com/how-big-is-a-house) I agree that the kids should be outside playing in parks and riding bikes and all that jazz and not in a tiny apartment. But then we have the "safety" fears when the world is far safer than when and where I grew up.

In my life I have lived in townhouses, an efficiency, rented a room in 2 houses, rented a whole house, lived in a dorm with roommates and lived in a big house with an acre back yard. They all have their plusses and minuses. I have not yet owned a house myself though. I would argue it's better the kids live in a small apartment than their parents have 2 hour round trip commutes because they had to switch jobs after they bought a house. I put a lot of value on the ease with which I can move closer to my job.




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